Integrated backscatter and digital acquisition during myocardial contrast echocardiography: Is there an advantage over conventional echocardiography for intracoronary injections?

Suad Ismail, Ananda R. Jayaweera, Danny M. Skyba, Jiri Sklenar, Norman C. Goodman, Sanjiv Kaul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was designed to answer the question of whether, despite their theoretic superiority, integrated backscatter imaging (IBS) and digital data acquisition (DA) offer any advantage over conventional echocardiography (CE) during quantitative myocardial contrast echocardiography. In vitro experiments were performed (1) to determine the microbubble concentration versus videointensity relationships for CE and IBS and (2) to define the relationship between flow through and microbubble transit rates for CE and IBS. These data were stored on videotape. In vivo experiments were performed whereby microbubbles were injected into the left anterior descending artery at different flow rates in 14 dogs and IBS and CE data were stored both in difital format and on videotape. Although the level of compression did not affect the microbubble concentration versus videointensity plots during IBS compared with CE, in practical terms the mean transit rate, peak intensity, and area under the curve were not affected by the level of compression for both forms of imaging as long as the postprocessing used for CE imaging was linear and the microbubble dose was small. In addition, although DA resulted in higher peak intensity and area under the curve compared with storage on videotape because of its broader dynamic range, the correlation between these measurements was excellent with both forms of image storage. We conclude that, although differences exist between CE and IBS and between DA and analog acquisition, these differences do not significantly affect the derivation of parameters from time-intensity plots during myocardial contrast echocardiography when contrast material is injected into a coronary artery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)453-464
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the American Society of Echocardiography
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Echocardiography
Microbubbles
Injections
Videotape Recording
Area Under Curve
Contrast Media
Coronary Vessels
Arteries
Dogs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Integrated backscatter and digital acquisition during myocardial contrast echocardiography : Is there an advantage over conventional echocardiography for intracoronary injections? / Ismail, Suad; Jayaweera, Ananda R.; Skyba, Danny M.; Sklenar, Jiri; Goodman, Norman C.; Kaul, Sanjiv.

In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, Vol. 8, No. 4, 1995, p. 453-464.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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