Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I gene deletion

Cecilia Camacho-Hübner, Kathryn (Katie) Woods, Adrian J L Clark, Martin O. Savage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The comprehensive analysis of single and double-targeted mutagenesis of the genes encoding IGF-I, IGF-II and the type 1 IGF receptor demonstrated the critical role that these genes play in embryonic development [9-11]. The clinical studies of patients with genetic defects in the GH-IGF axis support the crucial role that IGF-I plays, not only in fetal growth but also in postnatal growth by mediating some of the growth-promoting effects of GH. The absence of circulating IGF-I as described in our patient and previously in patients with Laron syndrome has demonstrated the importance of circulating IGF-I in the feedback control of GH secretion [22,26]. Our studies have also shown that the absence of a functional IGF-I gene is compatible with life, but has marked effects in prenatal and postnatal linear growth and a significant impact in metabolic homeostasis, diminishing insulin sensitivity. The investigation of the IGF-I gene in children with severe growth retardation has expanded over the years [27,28]. Recent studies have investigated the association of possible genetic variations of the IGF-I gene with birth size (small for gestational age) in different populations [29,30]. Although the initial study did not find an association between IGF-I polymorphisms and birth size, a more recent study has shown transmission disequilibrium of two alleles in two different markers of the IGF-I gene in children with short stature born small for gestational age [30]. Therefore, allelic variance of the IGF-I gene may play a role in both prenatal and postnatal growth. Finally, the unravelling of genes in the GH-IGF system and their protein structures has enabled us to improve the diagnosis of IGF-I deficiency at the molecular level and to use appropriate doses of IGF-I treatment in affected individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-361
Number of pages5
JournalReviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gene Deletion
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Genes
Growth
Somatomedins
Gestational Age
Laron Syndrome
Parturition
IGF Type 1 Receptor
Insulin-Like Growth Factor II
Fetal Development
Mutagenesis
Embryonic Development
Insulin Resistance
Homeostasis
Alleles

Keywords

  • Growth
  • Growth hormone
  • IGF-I
  • IGF-I system
  • Insulin insensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I gene deletion. / Camacho-Hübner, Cecilia; Woods, Kathryn (Katie); Clark, Adrian J L; Savage, Martin O.

In: Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, Vol. 3, No. 4, 12.2002, p. 357-361.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Camacho-Hübner, Cecilia ; Woods, Kathryn (Katie) ; Clark, Adrian J L ; Savage, Martin O. / Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I gene deletion. In: Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders. 2002 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 357-361.
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