Insulin-like growth factor I as an intraovarian regulator: Basic and clinical implications

E. Y. Adashi, C. E. Resnick, E. R. Hernandez, A. Hurwitz, Charles Roberts, D. Leroith, Ronald (Ron) Rosenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although much remains to be learned with respect to the possible relevance of IGF-I to ovarian physiology, it may be possible at this time to tentatively formulate possible functions of IGF-I in this connection: 1. Amplification of gonadotropin hormonal action-a key requirement given the exponential nature of follicular development. 2. Integration of follicular development-an essential facet concerned with the coordination of granulosa- theca cooperation. 3. Selection of dominant follicle(s)-a speculative proposition assuming timely and selective activation of the IGF-I system in 'chosen' follicles. Aside from its possible role(s) in the course of established follicular cycles, IGF-I (and/or IGF-II) may also participate in the very formation of the follicular apparatus during the late fetal/early neonatal period. Although the ovary is gonadotropin-independent at that time, we previously showed that IGF-I may well interact with VIPergic input now implicated in the morphodifferentiation of the follicular apparatus. Similarly, IGF-I may be concerned with the promotion of juvenile and early pubertal follicular gonadotropin (FSH) levels; ovarian IGF-I may have a bearing on the puberty-promoting effect of growth hormone. Indeed, an association appears to exist between isolated growth hormone deficiency and delayed puberty in both rodents and human subjects, a process reversed by systemic growth hormone replacement therapy. Given that ovarian IGF-I and its receptor may be growth hormone-dependent, it is tempting to speculate that the ability of growth hormone to accelerate pubertal maturation may be due, at least in part, to the promotion of ovarian IGF-I production and reception with the consequent local potentiation of gonadotropin action.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-168
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume626
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Growth Hormone
Gonadotropins
Pituitary Dwarfism
Delayed Puberty
IGF Type 1 Receptor
Insulin-Like Growth Factor II
Insulin
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Physiology
Puberty
Hormones
Amplification
Ovary
Rodentia
Chemical activation
Association reactions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Adashi, E. Y., Resnick, C. E., Hernandez, E. R., Hurwitz, A., Roberts, C., Leroith, D., & Rosenfeld, R. R. (1991). Insulin-like growth factor I as an intraovarian regulator: Basic and clinical implications. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 626, 161-168.

Insulin-like growth factor I as an intraovarian regulator : Basic and clinical implications. / Adashi, E. Y.; Resnick, C. E.; Hernandez, E. R.; Hurwitz, A.; Roberts, Charles; Leroith, D.; Rosenfeld, Ronald (Ron).

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 626, 1991, p. 161-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adashi, EY, Resnick, CE, Hernandez, ER, Hurwitz, A, Roberts, C, Leroith, D & Rosenfeld, RR 1991, 'Insulin-like growth factor I as an intraovarian regulator: Basic and clinical implications', Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 626, pp. 161-168.
Adashi, E. Y. ; Resnick, C. E. ; Hernandez, E. R. ; Hurwitz, A. ; Roberts, Charles ; Leroith, D. ; Rosenfeld, Ronald (Ron). / Insulin-like growth factor I as an intraovarian regulator : Basic and clinical implications. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1991 ; Vol. 626. pp. 161-168.
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