Instrumented balance and walking assessments in persons with multiple sclerosis show strong test-retest reliability

Jordan J. Craig, Adam P. Bruetsch, Sharon G. Lynch, Fay Horak, Jessie M. Huisinga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There is a need for objective movement assessment for clinical research trials aimed at improving gait and balance in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Wireless inertial sensors can accurately measure numerous walking and balance parameters but these measures require evaluation of reliability in PwMS. The current study determined the test-retest reliability of wireless inertial sensor measures obtained during an instrumented standing balance test and an instrumented Timed Up and Go test in PwMS. Methods: Fifteen PwMS and 15 healthy control subjects (HC) performed an instrumented standing balance and instrumented Timed Up and Go (TUG) test on two separate days. Ten instrumented standing balance measures and 18 instrumented TUG measures were computed from the wireless sensor data. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to determine test-retest reliability of all instrumented standing balance and instrumented TUG measures. Correlations were evaluated between the instrumented standing balance and instrumented TUG measures and self-reported walking and balance performance, fall history, and clinical disability. Results: For both groups, ICCs for instrumented standing balance measures were best for spatio-temporal measures, while frequency measures were less reliable. All instrumented TUG measures exhibited good to excellent (ICCs > 0.60) test-retest reliability in PwMS and in HC. There were no correlations between self-report walking and balance scores and instrumented TUG or instrumented standing balance metrics, but there were correlations between instrumented TUG and instrumented standing balance metrics and fall history and clinical disability status. Conclusions: Measures from the instrumented standing balance and instrumented TUG tests exhibit good to excellent reliability, demonstrating their potential as objective assessments for clinical trials. A subset of the most reliable measures is recommended for measuring walking and balance in clinical settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number43
JournalJournal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 22 2017

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Reproducibility of Results
Multiple Sclerosis
Walking
Healthy Volunteers
History
Clinical Trials
Gait
Self Report
Research

Keywords

  • Accelerometers
  • Balance
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Reliability
  • Walking
  • Wireless sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Instrumented balance and walking assessments in persons with multiple sclerosis show strong test-retest reliability. / Craig, Jordan J.; Bruetsch, Adam P.; Lynch, Sharon G.; Horak, Fay; Huisinga, Jessie M.

In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, Vol. 14, No. 1, 43, 22.05.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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