Inpatient management of hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes

Andrew Ahmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the past 4 years, the scientific literature addressing issues relevant to inpatient hyperglycemia and its management has grown dramatically but remains incomplete. The growing interest in inpatient diabetes management is particularly pertinent given the epidemic rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and the associated increase in the proportion of inpatients carrying this diagnosis. The benefits of aggressive glucose control are well-established in certain admission categories. These benefits likely apply to many other admission diagnoses, but remain unproven at this time. Similarly, the best methods of glucose control remain uncertain in the various inpatient settings. Intensive insulin infusion therapy is becoming the standard care in the intensive care unit setting. Its use is also growing in less acute inpatient settings but requires further study. Inpatient subcutaneous insulin recommendations are general based on experience gained in the ou patient setting but offer a practical, physiologic approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)346-351
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Diabetes Reports
Volume4
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Inpatients
Insulin
Literature
Glucose
Hyperglycemia
Intensive Care Units

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Inpatient management of hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes. / Ahmann, Andrew.

In: Current Diabetes Reports, Vol. 4, No. 5, 10.2004, p. 346-351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ahmann, Andrew. / Inpatient management of hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes. In: Current Diabetes Reports. 2004 ; Vol. 4, No. 5. pp. 346-351.
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