Injury mortality in American Indian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children in new Mexico, 1958-1982

Lenora M. Olson, Thomas Becker, Charles L. Wiggins, Charles R. Key, Jonathan M. Samet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Childhood fatalities from injuries are a serious public health problem in New Mexico, a state which ranks second in the nation in injury-related mortality rates. To determine the extent of injury mortality in children in this state, and to examine time trends and differences in mortality rates in New Mexico's American Indian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children aged 0-14 years, we analyzed vital records collected from 1958 to 1982. American Indian children experienced the highest mortality rates from all external causes combined. Among all three major ethnic groups, children aged 0-4 years were at the highest risk for injury fatalities. Unintentional injuries accounted for 85% of all injury-related deaths. Motor vehicle crashes and drowning were the first and second leading causes of death in all three groups, while other important causes of death included fire, choking on food or other objects, poisoning, and homicide. Although the fatality rates on most types of injuries decreased over the 25-year period, childhood fatality rates for motor vehicle crashes and homicide increased in each ethnic group. Despite the overall decrease in injury mortality rates in New Mexican children, the rates are excessively high compared to other states, especially in American Indian children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-486
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

North American Indians
American Indian
Hispanic Americans
Mexico
mortality
Mortality
Wounds and Injuries
cause of death
homicide
motor vehicle
Homicide
ethnic group
Motor Vehicles
childhood
Ethnic Groups
Cause of Death
Child Mortality
American Indians
Airway Obstruction
public health

Keywords

  • cross-cultural comparison
  • Hispanic Americans
  • Indians
  • North American
  • wounds and injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Development
  • Health(social science)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Injury mortality in American Indian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children in new Mexico, 1958-1982. / Olson, Lenora M.; Becker, Thomas; Wiggins, Charles L.; Key, Charles R.; Samet, Jonathan M.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 30, No. 4, 1990, p. 479-486.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Olson, Lenora M. ; Becker, Thomas ; Wiggins, Charles L. ; Key, Charles R. ; Samet, Jonathan M. / Injury mortality in American Indian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children in new Mexico, 1958-1982. In: Social Science and Medicine. 1990 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 479-486.
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