Infrared neural stimulation

A new stimulation tool for central nervous system applications

Mykyta Chernov, Anna Roe

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The traditional approach to modulating brain function (in both clinical and basic science applications) is to tap into the neural circuitry using electrical currents applied via implanted electrodes. However, it suffers from a number of problems, including the risk of tissue trauma, poor spatial specificity, and the inability to selectively stimulate neuronal subtypes. About a decade ago, optical alternatives to electrical stimulation started to emerge in order to address the shortcomings of electrical stimulation. We describe the use of one optical stimulation technique, infrared neural stimulation (INS), during which short (of the order of a millisecond) pulses of infrared light are delivered to the neural tissue. Very focal stimulation is achieved via a thermal mechanism and stimulation location can be quickly adjusted by redirecting the light. After describing some of the work done in the peripheral nervous system, we focus on the use of INS in the central nervous system to investigate functional connectivity in the visual and somatosensory areas, target specific functional domains, and influence behavior of an awake nonhuman primate. We conclude with a positive outlook for INS as a tool for safe and precise targeted brain stimulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number011011
JournalNeurophotonics
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Electric Stimulation
Central Nervous System
Light
Implanted Electrodes
Peripheral Nervous System
Brain
Primates
Hot Temperature
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • cerebral cortex
  • infrared neural stimulation
  • nonhuman primate
  • optical imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Infrared neural stimulation : A new stimulation tool for central nervous system applications. / Chernov, Mykyta; Roe, Anna.

In: Neurophotonics, Vol. 1, No. 1, 011011, 01.07.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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