Influence of trauma system implementation on process of care delivered to seriously injured patients in rural trauma centers

Christine J. Olson, Melanie Arthur, Richard Mullins, Donna Rowland, Jerris R. Hedges, N. Clay Mann

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    57 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background. Statewide trauma systems are implemented by health care policy makers whose intent is to improve the process of care delivered to seriously injured patients. In Oregon, Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) training was mandated for all physicians employed in the emergency department of trauma centers. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mandatory ATLS training favorably influenced processes of care. Methods. Seriously injured patients treated at 9 rural Level 3 and Level 4 hospitals were studied before (PRE) and after (POST) implementation of Oregon's trauma system. The processes of care evaluated on the basis of chart review were 20 diagnostic and therapeutic interventions advocated in the ATLS course. A cumulative process score (CPS) between 0 and 1 was assigned on the basis of the processes of care delivered. A CPS of 1 indicated optimal process of care. Results. Mean CPS for 506 PRE period patients (0.44 ± 0.27) was significantly lower than the mean CPS for 512 POST period patients (0.57 ± 0.27) with an unpaired t test (P

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)273-279
    Number of pages7
    JournalSurgery
    Volume130
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2001

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    Advanced Trauma Life Support Care
    Trauma Centers
    Wounds and Injuries
    Health Policy
    Administrative Personnel
    Hospital Emergency Service
    Delivery of Health Care
    Physicians
    Therapeutics

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Surgery

    Cite this

    Influence of trauma system implementation on process of care delivered to seriously injured patients in rural trauma centers. / Olson, Christine J.; Arthur, Melanie; Mullins, Richard; Rowland, Donna; Hedges, Jerris R.; Mann, N. Clay.

    In: Surgery, Vol. 130, No. 2, 2001, p. 273-279.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Olson, Christine J. ; Arthur, Melanie ; Mullins, Richard ; Rowland, Donna ; Hedges, Jerris R. ; Mann, N. Clay. / Influence of trauma system implementation on process of care delivered to seriously injured patients in rural trauma centers. In: Surgery. 2001 ; Vol. 130, No. 2. pp. 273-279.
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