Influence of selenite and fourteen trace elements on cataractogenesis in the rat

Thomas (Tom) Shearer, R. S. Anderson, J. L. Britton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The purposes of these experiments were to measure the influence of 14 trace elements on cataractogenesis and to test if these trace elements could prevent cataracts induced by selenium. On days 5-9 postpartum, suckling white rats received daily subcutaneous injections of either selenium (0.15 μmoles Se, as Na2SeO3, per pup) or selenium plus one of 14 other trace elements (separate subcutaneous injection) at one to five times the molar concentration of selenium. The frequency and severity of cataracts at three locations in the lens were assessed by slit-lamp examination on day 26-28 postpartum. Seven ions were found to be effective in preventing selenium-induced cataracts (% protection): mercuric (100%), silver (80%), cyanide (75%), arsenite (75%), cadmium (60%), and cupric (44%). Tellurite ion offered only 20% protection, while ferrous, zinc, lead, chromic, molybdate, tungstate, and vanadate ions provided no protection against selenium-induced cataract. No significant differences were found between the concentrations of selenium in the lenses of control and cataractous lenses when measured approximately three weeks after selenium injection. Except for selenium, none of the trace minerals alone caused cataracts under our experimental conditions. In addition to subcutaneous injection of selenium, oral administration of this element was also found to cause cataract. It was concluded that among the ions studied, selinite was a powerful and rapid promoter of nuclear cataract formation, and that the protective ions may serve as useful probes for elucidating the mechanism of selenium-induced cataracts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)417-423
Number of pages7
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume24
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1983

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Selenious Acid
Trace Elements
Selenium
Cataract
Subcutaneous Injections
Ions
Lenses
Postpartum Period
Vanadates
Cyanides
Cadmium
Silver
Oral Administration
Zinc

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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Influence of selenite and fourteen trace elements on cataractogenesis in the rat. / Shearer, Thomas (Tom); Anderson, R. S.; Britton, J. L.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 24, No. 4, 1983, p. 417-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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