Infection of the Retina by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I

Roger J. Pomerantz, Daniel R. Kuritzkes, Suzanne M. de la Monte, Teresa R. Rota, Ann S. Baker, Daniel Albert, David H. Bor, Edward L. Feldman, Robert T. Schooley, Martin S. Hirsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

156 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

HUMAN immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).1 2 3 4 HIV penetrates specific cells bearing the CD4 surface antigen5,6 and has been observed in helper T lymphocytes, monocytes, Langerhans' cells, and recently, astrocytes, endothelial cells, oligodendrocytes, and neurons.7 8 9 10 11 HIV-infected cells have been found in the blood, semen, vaginal secretions, breast milk, lymph nodes, brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves.7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Many patients with HIV infection have a variety of ocular abnormalities not associated with obvious opportunistic infections; these abnormalities include cotton-wool spots and microvascular changes of the retina.20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 These observations, together with the established neurotropism of HIV,.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1643-1647
Number of pages5
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume317
Issue number26
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 24 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Retina
HIV
Viruses
Infection
X-Linked Combined Immunodeficiency Diseases
Eye Abnormalities
Langerhans Cells
Wool
Opportunistic Infections
Oligodendroglia
Human Milk
Virus Diseases
Helper-Inducer T-Lymphocytes
Semen
Astrocytes
Monocytes
Spinal Cord
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Endothelial Cells
Lymph Nodes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pomerantz, R. J., Kuritzkes, D. R., de la Monte, S. M., Rota, T. R., Baker, A. S., Albert, D., ... Hirsch, M. S. (1987). Infection of the Retina by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I. New England Journal of Medicine, 317(26), 1643-1647. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM198712243172607

Infection of the Retina by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I. / Pomerantz, Roger J.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; de la Monte, Suzanne M.; Rota, Teresa R.; Baker, Ann S.; Albert, Daniel; Bor, David H.; Feldman, Edward L.; Schooley, Robert T.; Hirsch, Martin S.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 317, No. 26, 24.12.1987, p. 1643-1647.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pomerantz, RJ, Kuritzkes, DR, de la Monte, SM, Rota, TR, Baker, AS, Albert, D, Bor, DH, Feldman, EL, Schooley, RT & Hirsch, MS 1987, 'Infection of the Retina by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 317, no. 26, pp. 1643-1647. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM198712243172607
Pomerantz RJ, Kuritzkes DR, de la Monte SM, Rota TR, Baker AS, Albert D et al. Infection of the Retina by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I. New England Journal of Medicine. 1987 Dec 24;317(26):1643-1647. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM198712243172607
Pomerantz, Roger J. ; Kuritzkes, Daniel R. ; de la Monte, Suzanne M. ; Rota, Teresa R. ; Baker, Ann S. ; Albert, Daniel ; Bor, David H. ; Feldman, Edward L. ; Schooley, Robert T. ; Hirsch, Martin S. / Infection of the Retina by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1987 ; Vol. 317, No. 26. pp. 1643-1647.
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