Infant mortality, low birth weight, and prematurity among Hispanic, white, and African American women in North Carolina

Jennie C. Leslie, Shelley L. Galvin, Sandra J. Diehl, Trude A. Bennett, Paul A. Buescher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The study was undertaken to compare Hispanic birth outcomes with those of white and African American women in North Carolina and to examine variables associated with adverse birth outcomes among Hispanic women. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective comparison of birth outcomes by ethnicity/race, from linked birth/infant death certificates in North Carolina (1993-1997) was conducted. Multivariate, binary logistic regression and χ2 analysis were used to examine relationships between available medical and sociodemographic index values and composite birth outcomes among Hispanic women. RESULTS: Infant mortality rates were lowest among Hispanic women. Low birth weight and prematurity rates were similar to those of white women and lower than those of African American women. Variables significantly related to healthy composite birth outcomes among Hispanic women included higher education, no preterm delivery history, prenatal care, marriage, and no daily tobacco use. CONCLUSION: Hispanic birth outcomes in North Carolina were better than those of African American women and similar to those of white women, despite use of prenatal care and socioeconomic characteristics similar to African American women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1238-1240
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume188
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003

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Keywords

  • Birth outcomes
  • Ethnicity
  • Hispanic
  • Infant mortality
  • North Carolina vital statistics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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