Induction therapy by anti-thymocyte globulin (rabbit) versus basiliximab in deceased donor renal transplants and the effect on delayed graft function and outcomes

C. E. Foster, R. R. Weng, M. Piper, K. Laugenou, H. Ichii, J. Lakey, Darren Malinoski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of induction therapy significantly reduces the incidence of acute rejection (AR) episodes posttransplantation and prevents delayed graft function (DGF). In our program, all adult deceased donor kidney transplant (DDKT) recipients receive immunosuppression induction therapy with either Basiliximab (anti-CD25 Ab) or rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (RATG). Our protocol is risk adjusted such that patients who are at a higher risk for DGF or AR received RATG and all other patients receive anti-CD25 Ab. We hypothesized that treating our higher-risk patients with RATG induction at the time of transplantation would lead to a lower rate of DGF and better outcomes. From August 1, 2005 through August 31, 2010, 116 consecutive adult patients received a DDKT in a single academic transplantation center. All DDKT patients received induction with RATG or anti-CD25 Ab. The induction decision was made prior to transplantation based on donor and recipient risk factors for AR and DGF. Transplants that were deemed at higher risk for DGF or AR based on donor factors or recipient factors received RATG. Medical records and patient databases were reviewed retrospectively. The use of RATG in higher-risk recipients for DGF and AR did not significantly reduce the DGF rate. At 6 months the function of the allograft function measured as creatinine clearance or serum creatinine was lower in the RATG group than the patients who received anti-CD25 Ab induction. The choice of induction therapy did not improve outcomes in high-risk patients in this short-term study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-166
Number of pages3
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Delayed Graft Function
Antilymphocyte Serum
Tissue Donors
Rabbits
Transplants
Kidney
Transplantation
Therapeutics
Creatinine
basiliximab
Immunosuppression
Medical Records
Allografts
Databases
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Induction therapy by anti-thymocyte globulin (rabbit) versus basiliximab in deceased donor renal transplants and the effect on delayed graft function and outcomes. / Foster, C. E.; Weng, R. R.; Piper, M.; Laugenou, K.; Ichii, H.; Lakey, J.; Malinoski, Darren.

In: Transplantation Proceedings, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 164-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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