Increasing the neurosurgical caseload at a military hospital

Initial experience with a joint military-Veterans Affairs (VA) sharing agreement

Brian T. Ragel, Derek A. Taggard, Paul Klimo, Jeannette M. Liu, Sandy Robison, Anne H. Sholes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Neurosurgeons at David Grant Medical Center (DGMC) have had low surgeon case volumes. Meanwhile, veterans have had long waits because of inadequate neurosurgical coverage. DGMC and Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) agreed to share resources to treat an underserved VA patient population. We analyzed number of cases, admissions, relative weighted product (RWP), and outpatient visits before and after this unique military-VA agreement. Methods: Number of operations, hospital admissions, RWP, and outpatient visits (January 2004-November 2007) were noted before or after October 2006. To normalize data, metric (e.g., number of cases) totals were divided by number of months neurosurgeons were available. Results: Before the agreement, two neurosurgeons performed 210 operations over 52 months (4.0 cases/month). After the agreement, two neurosurgeons performed 177 cases over 26 months (6.8 cases/month). This corresponded to a 2.2-, 2.2-, and 2.0-fold increase in hospital admissions, RWP, and outpatient visits, respectively. Conclusions: The sharing agreement resulted in 1.7-fold increase in operative cases. This military-VA venture provides military neurosurgeons with more surgical cases and provides neurosurgical care to a previously underserved patient population. Reprint and

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-105
Number of pages3
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume174
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Military Hospitals
Veterans
Joints
Outpatients
Vulnerable Populations
Neurosurgeons
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Ragel, B. T., Taggard, D. A., Klimo, P., Liu, J. M., Robison, S., & Sholes, A. H. (2009). Increasing the neurosurgical caseload at a military hospital: Initial experience with a joint military-Veterans Affairs (VA) sharing agreement. Military Medicine, 174(2), 103-105.

Increasing the neurosurgical caseload at a military hospital : Initial experience with a joint military-Veterans Affairs (VA) sharing agreement. / Ragel, Brian T.; Taggard, Derek A.; Klimo, Paul; Liu, Jeannette M.; Robison, Sandy; Sholes, Anne H.

In: Military Medicine, Vol. 174, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 103-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ragel, BT, Taggard, DA, Klimo, P, Liu, JM, Robison, S & Sholes, AH 2009, 'Increasing the neurosurgical caseload at a military hospital: Initial experience with a joint military-Veterans Affairs (VA) sharing agreement', Military Medicine, vol. 174, no. 2, pp. 103-105.
Ragel, Brian T. ; Taggard, Derek A. ; Klimo, Paul ; Liu, Jeannette M. ; Robison, Sandy ; Sholes, Anne H. / Increasing the neurosurgical caseload at a military hospital : Initial experience with a joint military-Veterans Affairs (VA) sharing agreement. In: Military Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 174, No. 2. pp. 103-105.
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