Increased maternal fat consumption during pregnancy alters body composition in neonatal mice

Stephanie Krasnow, My Linh T Nguyen, Daniel Marks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Maternal overnutrition prior to and during gestation causes pronounced metabolic dysfunction in the adult offspring. However, less is known about metabolic adaptations in the offspring that occur independently of postnatal growth and nutrition. Therefore, we evaluated the impact of excess maternal dietary lipid intake on the in utero programming of body composition, hepatic function, and hypothalamic development in newborn (P0) offspring. Female mice were fed a low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) diet and were mated after 4, 12, and 23 wk. A subset of the obese HF dams was switched to the LF diet during the second (DR2) or third (DR3) pregnancies. The HF offspring accrued more fat mass than the LF pups, regardless of duration of maternal HF diet consumption or prepregnancy maternal adiposity. Increased neonatal adiposity was not observed in the DR3 pups. Liver weights were reduced in the HF offspring but not in the DR2 or DR3 pups. Offspring hepatic triglyceride content was reduced in the HF pups, but hepatic inflammation and expression of lipid metabolism genes were largely unaffected by maternal diet. Maternal diet did not alter the hypothalamic expression of orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides in the offspring. Thus, the intrauterine programming of increased neonatal adiposity and reduced liver size by maternal overnutrition is evident in mice at birth and occurs prior to the development of maternal obesity. These observations demonstrate that dietary intervention during pregnancy minimizes the deleterious effects of maternal obesity on offspring body composition, potentially reducing the offsprings' risk of developing obesity and related diseases later in life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume301
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Fingerprint

Body Composition
Fats
Mothers
Pregnancy
Adiposity
Overnutrition
Liver
Obesity
High Fat Diet
Diet
Fat-Restricted Diet
Neuropeptides
Lipid Metabolism
Triglycerides
Parturition
Inflammation
Lipids
Weights and Measures
Growth

Keywords

  • Hypothalamus
  • Inflammation
  • Liver
  • Metabolic programming
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Increased maternal fat consumption during pregnancy alters body composition in neonatal mice. / Krasnow, Stephanie; Nguyen, My Linh T; Marks, Daniel.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 301, No. 6, 12.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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