Increased Arterial Stiffness Adversely Affects Left Ventricular Mechanics in Patients With Pediatric Takayasu Arteritis From a Toronto Cohort

Heynric B. Grotenhuis, Florence A. Aeschlimann, Wei Hui, Cameron Slorach, Rae S.M. Yeung, Susanne M. Benseler, Timothy J. Bradley, Lars Grosse-Wortmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/Objective Takayasu arteritis (TA) is characterized by extensive aortic, large and midsize arterial wall inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the morphological and elastic properties of the aorta and large arteries and the impact on left ventricular (LV) mechanics in children with TA. Methods Seven pediatric TA patients (6 female patients, 13.8 ± 3.2 years) were assessed with magnetic resonance imaging, vascular ultrasound, applanation tonometry, and echocardiography from February 2015 until July 2017 and compared with 7 age- and sex-matched controls. Takayasu arteritis disease activity was assessed clinically by the Pediatric Vasculitis Activity Score (PVAS). Results Pediatric TA patients showed increased carotid-to-radial artery pulse wave velocity (8.1 ± 1.8 vs. 6.4 ± 0.6 m/s, p = 0.03) and increased carotid-to-femoral artery pulse wave velocity (8.3 ± 1.9 vs. 5.1 ± 0.8 m/s, p < 0.01) when compared with controls. Patients demonstrated increased LV mass index (74.3 ± 18.8 vs. 56.3 ± 10.9 g/m2, p = 0.04), altered myocardial deformation with increased basal rotation (-9.8 ± 4.5 vs. -4.0 ± 2.0 degrees, p = 0.01) and torsion (19.9 ± 8.1 vs. 9.1 ± 3.1 degrees, p = 0.01), and impaired LV diastolic function with decreased mitral valve E/A ratio (1.45 ± 0.17 vs. 2.40 ± 0.84, p = 0.01), increased mitral valve E/E′ ratio (6.8 ± 1.4 vs. 4.9 ± 0.7, p < 0.01), and increased pulmonary vein A-wave velocity (26.7 ± 5.7 vs. 16.8 ± 3.3 cm/s, p = 0.03). Carotid-to-radial artery pulse wave velocity was associated with systolic (R = 0.94, p < 0.01), diastolic (R = 0.85, p = 0.02), and mean blood pressure (R = 0.91, p < 0.01), as well as disease activity by PVAS (R = 0.75, p = 0.05). The PVAS was associated with carotid-to-radial artery pulse wave velocity (R = 0.75, p = 0.05), as well as systolic (R = 0.84, p = 0.02), diastolic (R = 0.82, p = 0.03), and mean blood pressure (R = 0.84, p = 0.02). Conclusions Increased arterial stiffness is present in pediatric TA patients and associated with increased blood pressure and TA disease activity. Pediatric TA patients demonstrate altered LV mechanics, LV hypertrophy, and impaired diastolic function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-175
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Rheumatology
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • arterial stiffness
  • echocardiography
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • pediatric
  • Takayasu arteritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Increased Arterial Stiffness Adversely Affects Left Ventricular Mechanics in Patients With Pediatric Takayasu Arteritis From a Toronto Cohort'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this