Incorporating Sex and Gender into Culturally Competent Simulation in Medical Education

Gillian A. Beauchamp, Alyson J. McGregor, Esther K. Choo, Basmah Safdar, Marna Rayl Greenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Simulation provides a vehicle to introduce sex and gender competent training into the education of medical trainees. Materials and Methods: Using the previously validated Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Sex and Gender Specific Health PubMed Advanced Search Tool, we reviewed the existing sex- and gender-based medical simulation education literature. A single article specifically addressed the incorporation of sex- and gender-based medicine in the development of simulation-based training. The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Sex and Gender Interest Group then collaboratively developed recommendations for the incorporation of these concepts into simulation training. Results: Collaboratively developed recommendations were as follows. Knowledge-based competency in sex- and gender-based medicine involves understanding the relevant key terminology. Attitude-based competencies include an understanding of tendencies toward bias in patient assessment and care, which can be addressed in the self-reflection component of a simulation debrief. Skill-based competencies include communication skills, assessing the social context in which a patient is pursuing medical care, and recognition of gender-based cultural models of health and disease. Successful implementation includes specific faculty development, administrative and financial resources, gender-specific simulation equipment and selection of standardized patients, and scenarios that address sex- and gender-based medical care. Conclusion: The adoption of sex and gender competent simulation has the potential to significantly impact medical training and the provision of empathetic and humanistic care while reducing sex- and gender-based health care disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1762-1767
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume28
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2019

Fingerprint

Medical Education
Health
Healthcare Disparities
Medicine
Public Opinion
PubMed
Terminology
Patient Selection
Patient Care
Communication
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • cultural competency
  • diversity
  • gender
  • medical education
  • resident training
  • sex
  • simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Incorporating Sex and Gender into Culturally Competent Simulation in Medical Education. / Beauchamp, Gillian A.; McGregor, Alyson J.; Choo, Esther K.; Safdar, Basmah; Greenberg, Marna Rayl.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 28, No. 12, 12.2019, p. 1762-1767.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beauchamp, Gillian A. ; McGregor, Alyson J. ; Choo, Esther K. ; Safdar, Basmah ; Greenberg, Marna Rayl. / Incorporating Sex and Gender into Culturally Competent Simulation in Medical Education. In: Journal of Women's Health. 2019 ; Vol. 28, No. 12. pp. 1762-1767.
@article{c254cfc0b32343928bc8f7b8537bb684,
title = "Incorporating Sex and Gender into Culturally Competent Simulation in Medical Education",
abstract = "Background and Objectives: Simulation provides a vehicle to introduce sex and gender competent training into the education of medical trainees. Materials and Methods: Using the previously validated Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Sex and Gender Specific Health PubMed Advanced Search Tool, we reviewed the existing sex- and gender-based medical simulation education literature. A single article specifically addressed the incorporation of sex- and gender-based medicine in the development of simulation-based training. The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Sex and Gender Interest Group then collaboratively developed recommendations for the incorporation of these concepts into simulation training. Results: Collaboratively developed recommendations were as follows. Knowledge-based competency in sex- and gender-based medicine involves understanding the relevant key terminology. Attitude-based competencies include an understanding of tendencies toward bias in patient assessment and care, which can be addressed in the self-reflection component of a simulation debrief. Skill-based competencies include communication skills, assessing the social context in which a patient is pursuing medical care, and recognition of gender-based cultural models of health and disease. Successful implementation includes specific faculty development, administrative and financial resources, gender-specific simulation equipment and selection of standardized patients, and scenarios that address sex- and gender-based medical care. Conclusion: The adoption of sex and gender competent simulation has the potential to significantly impact medical training and the provision of empathetic and humanistic care while reducing sex- and gender-based health care disparities.",
keywords = "cultural competency, diversity, gender, medical education, resident training, sex, simulation",
author = "Beauchamp, {Gillian A.} and McGregor, {Alyson J.} and Choo, {Esther K.} and Basmah Safdar and Greenberg, {Marna Rayl}",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1089/jwh.2018.7271",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "1762--1767",
journal = "Journal of Women's Health",
issn = "1540-9996",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Incorporating Sex and Gender into Culturally Competent Simulation in Medical Education

AU - Beauchamp, Gillian A.

AU - McGregor, Alyson J.

AU - Choo, Esther K.

AU - Safdar, Basmah

AU - Greenberg, Marna Rayl

PY - 2019/12

Y1 - 2019/12

N2 - Background and Objectives: Simulation provides a vehicle to introduce sex and gender competent training into the education of medical trainees. Materials and Methods: Using the previously validated Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Sex and Gender Specific Health PubMed Advanced Search Tool, we reviewed the existing sex- and gender-based medical simulation education literature. A single article specifically addressed the incorporation of sex- and gender-based medicine in the development of simulation-based training. The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Sex and Gender Interest Group then collaboratively developed recommendations for the incorporation of these concepts into simulation training. Results: Collaboratively developed recommendations were as follows. Knowledge-based competency in sex- and gender-based medicine involves understanding the relevant key terminology. Attitude-based competencies include an understanding of tendencies toward bias in patient assessment and care, which can be addressed in the self-reflection component of a simulation debrief. Skill-based competencies include communication skills, assessing the social context in which a patient is pursuing medical care, and recognition of gender-based cultural models of health and disease. Successful implementation includes specific faculty development, administrative and financial resources, gender-specific simulation equipment and selection of standardized patients, and scenarios that address sex- and gender-based medical care. Conclusion: The adoption of sex and gender competent simulation has the potential to significantly impact medical training and the provision of empathetic and humanistic care while reducing sex- and gender-based health care disparities.

AB - Background and Objectives: Simulation provides a vehicle to introduce sex and gender competent training into the education of medical trainees. Materials and Methods: Using the previously validated Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Sex and Gender Specific Health PubMed Advanced Search Tool, we reviewed the existing sex- and gender-based medical simulation education literature. A single article specifically addressed the incorporation of sex- and gender-based medicine in the development of simulation-based training. The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Sex and Gender Interest Group then collaboratively developed recommendations for the incorporation of these concepts into simulation training. Results: Collaboratively developed recommendations were as follows. Knowledge-based competency in sex- and gender-based medicine involves understanding the relevant key terminology. Attitude-based competencies include an understanding of tendencies toward bias in patient assessment and care, which can be addressed in the self-reflection component of a simulation debrief. Skill-based competencies include communication skills, assessing the social context in which a patient is pursuing medical care, and recognition of gender-based cultural models of health and disease. Successful implementation includes specific faculty development, administrative and financial resources, gender-specific simulation equipment and selection of standardized patients, and scenarios that address sex- and gender-based medical care. Conclusion: The adoption of sex and gender competent simulation has the potential to significantly impact medical training and the provision of empathetic and humanistic care while reducing sex- and gender-based health care disparities.

KW - cultural competency

KW - diversity

KW - gender

KW - medical education

KW - resident training

KW - sex

KW - simulation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071590725&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85071590725&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/jwh.2018.7271

DO - 10.1089/jwh.2018.7271

M3 - Article

C2 - 30601088

AN - SCOPUS:85071590725

VL - 28

SP - 1762

EP - 1767

JO - Journal of Women's Health

JF - Journal of Women's Health

SN - 1540-9996

IS - 12

ER -