Inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, academic skills and psychopathology in boys with and without haemophilia

M. L S Spencer, D. L. Wodrich, W. Schultz, L. Wagner, Michael Recht

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine if symptoms of inattention (IN) and hyperactivity-impulsivity (HI) differ for boys with and without haemophilia and to determine if IN and HI are the essential behavioural dimensions on which the two groups differ. Using a quasi-experimental design, parents' and teachers' ratings of IN and HI for boys with and without haemophilia (ages 6-14 years) were compared. IN and HI were also assessed with a psychometric task, as were reading and math, psychopathology, and educational status via various techniques. Boys with haemophilia (n = 19) were rated higher on dimensions of HI and IN by teachers (P = 0.01, P = 0.02, respectively) but only on HI by parents (P = 0.01). In addition, the haemophilia group committed more impulsivity errors on a psychometric task (P = 0.01). Trends, but not statistically significant differences, were found on reading and math scores, and the haemophilia group had more special education participation. Compared to national norms, borderline range scores on the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-related dimensions of HI and psychometrically measured impulsivity characterized the boys with haemophilia. Although not addressing formal diagnoses, this study found that boys with haemophilia risk ADHD-spectrum problems, especially HI, and special education participation, but not frank academic deficits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)701-706
Number of pages6
JournalHaemophilia
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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Impulsive Behavior
Hemophilia A
Psychopathology
Special Education
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Psychometrics
Reading
Parents
Educational Status
Research Design

Keywords

  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Psychopathology
  • Special education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, academic skills and psychopathology in boys with and without haemophilia. / Spencer, M. L S; Wodrich, D. L.; Schultz, W.; Wagner, L.; Recht, Michael.

In: Haemophilia, Vol. 15, No. 3, 2009, p. 701-706.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Spencer, M. L S ; Wodrich, D. L. ; Schultz, W. ; Wagner, L. ; Recht, Michael. / Inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, academic skills and psychopathology in boys with and without haemophilia. In: Haemophilia. 2009 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 701-706.
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