Inadequate weight gain in overweight and obese pregnant women: What is the effect on fetal growth?

Patrick M. Catalano, Lisa Mele, Mark B. Landon, Susan M. Ramin, Uma M. Reddy, Brian Casey, Ronald J. Wapner, Michael W. Varner, Dwight J. Rouse, John M. Thorp, George Saade, Yoram Sorokin, Alan M. Peaceman, Jorge Tolosa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective We sought to evaluate inadequate gestational weight gain and fetal growth among overweight and obese women. Study Design We conducted an analysis of prospective singleton term pregnancies in which 1053 overweight and obese women gained 5 kg (14.4 6.2 kg) or 188 who either lost or gained 5 kg (1.1 4.4 kg). Birthweight, fat mass, and lean mass were assessed using anthropometry. Small for gestational age (SGA) was defined as 10th percentile of a standard US population. Univariable and multivariable analysis evaluated the association between weight change and neonatal morphometry. Results There was no significant difference in age, race, smoking, parity, or gestational age between groups. Weight loss or gain 5 kg was associated with SGA, 18/188 (9.6%) vs 51/1053 (4.9%); (adjusted odds ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-4.7 P =.003). Neonates of women who lost or gained 5 kg had lower birthweight (3258-443 vs 3467 492 g, P.0001), fat mass (403 175 vs 471 193 g, P 0001), and lean mass (2855 321 vs 2995 347 g, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume211
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Fetal Development
Gestational Age
Weight Gain
Pregnant Women
Fats
Anthropometry
Parity
Weight Loss
Age Groups
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Newborn Infant
Confidence Intervals
Weights and Measures
Pregnancy
Population

Keywords

  • fetal anthropometry
  • gestational diabetes
  • gestational weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Inadequate weight gain in overweight and obese pregnant women : What is the effect on fetal growth? / Catalano, Patrick M.; Mele, Lisa; Landon, Mark B.; Ramin, Susan M.; Reddy, Uma M.; Casey, Brian; Wapner, Ronald J.; Varner, Michael W.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Thorp, John M.; Saade, George; Sorokin, Yoram; Peaceman, Alan M.; Tolosa, Jorge.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 211, No. 2, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Catalano, PM, Mele, L, Landon, MB, Ramin, SM, Reddy, UM, Casey, B, Wapner, RJ, Varner, MW, Rouse, DJ, Thorp, JM, Saade, G, Sorokin, Y, Peaceman, AM & Tolosa, J 2014, 'Inadequate weight gain in overweight and obese pregnant women: What is the effect on fetal growth?', American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 211, no. 2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2014.02.004
Catalano, Patrick M. ; Mele, Lisa ; Landon, Mark B. ; Ramin, Susan M. ; Reddy, Uma M. ; Casey, Brian ; Wapner, Ronald J. ; Varner, Michael W. ; Rouse, Dwight J. ; Thorp, John M. ; Saade, George ; Sorokin, Yoram ; Peaceman, Alan M. ; Tolosa, Jorge. / Inadequate weight gain in overweight and obese pregnant women : What is the effect on fetal growth?. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2014 ; Vol. 211, No. 2.
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