In vivo three-dimensional imaging of normal tissue and tumors in the rabbit pleural cavity using endoscopic swept source optical coherence tomography with thoracoscopic guidance

Tuqiang Xie, Gangjun Liu, Kelly Kreuter, Sari Mahon, Henri Colt, David Mukai, George M. Peavy, Zhongping Chen, Matthew Brenner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to develop a dynamic tunable focal distance graded-refractive-index lens rod-based high-speed 3-D swept-source (SS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) endoscopic system and demonstrate real-time in vivo, high-resolution (10-μm) imaging of pleural-based malignancies in an animal model. The GRIN lens-based 3-D SS OCT system, which images at 39 fps with 512 A-lines per frame, was able to capture images of and detect abnormalities during thoracoscopy in the thoracic cavity, including the pleura, chest wall, pericardium, and the lungs. The abnormalities were confirmed by histological evaluation and compared to OCT findings. The dynamic tunable focal distance range and rapid speed of the probe and SS prototype OCT system enabled this first-reported application of in vivo 3-D thoracoscopic imaging of pleural-based malignancies. The imaging probe of the system was found to be easily adaptable to various sites within the thoracic cavity and can be readily adapted to other sites, including rigid airway endoscopic examinations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number064045
JournalJournal of biomedical optics
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Endoscopic imaging
  • Gradient-index lenses
  • Imaging system
  • Medical and biological imaging
  • Optical coherence tomography
  • Thoracoscopic imaging
  • Thoracoscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Biomedical Engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'In vivo three-dimensional imaging of normal tissue and tumors in the rabbit pleural cavity using endoscopic swept source optical coherence tomography with thoracoscopic guidance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this