In vivo migration and function of transferred HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T cells

Scott J. Brodie, Deborah Lewinsohn, Bruce K. Patterson, Daniel Jiyamapa, John Krieger, Lawrence Corey, Philip D. Greenberg, Stanley R. Riddell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

272 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The persistence of HIV replication in infected individuals may reflect an inadequate host HIV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. The functional activity of HIV-specific CTLs and the ability of these effector cells to migrate in vivo to sites of infection was directly assessed by expanding autologous HIV-1 Gag-specific CD8+ CTL clones in vitro and adoptively transferring these CTLs to HIV-infected individuals. The transferred CTLs retained lytic function in vivo, accumulated adjacent to HIV-infected cells in lymph nodes and transiently reduced the levels of circulating productively infected CD4+ T cells. These results provide direct evidence that HIV-specific CTLs target sites of HIV replication and mediate antiviral activity, and indicate that the development of immunotherapeutic approaches to sustain a strong CTL response to HIV may be a useful adjunct to treatment of HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-41
Number of pages8
JournalNature Medicine
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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T-cells
HIV-1
HIV
T-Lymphocytes
Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes
Antiviral Agents
HIV Infections
Clone Cells
Lymph Nodes
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Brodie, S. J., Lewinsohn, D., Patterson, B. K., Jiyamapa, D., Krieger, J., Corey, L., ... Riddell, S. R. (1999). In vivo migration and function of transferred HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T cells. Nature Medicine, 5(1), 34-41. https://doi.org/10.1038/4716

In vivo migration and function of transferred HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T cells. / Brodie, Scott J.; Lewinsohn, Deborah; Patterson, Bruce K.; Jiyamapa, Daniel; Krieger, John; Corey, Lawrence; Greenberg, Philip D.; Riddell, Stanley R.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 1, 1999, p. 34-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brodie, SJ, Lewinsohn, D, Patterson, BK, Jiyamapa, D, Krieger, J, Corey, L, Greenberg, PD & Riddell, SR 1999, 'In vivo migration and function of transferred HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T cells', Nature Medicine, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 34-41. https://doi.org/10.1038/4716
Brodie, Scott J. ; Lewinsohn, Deborah ; Patterson, Bruce K. ; Jiyamapa, Daniel ; Krieger, John ; Corey, Lawrence ; Greenberg, Philip D. ; Riddell, Stanley R. / In vivo migration and function of transferred HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T cells. In: Nature Medicine. 1999 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 34-41.
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