In Vivo Laser Confocal Microscopy Using the HRT-Rostock Cornea Module: Diversity and Diagnostic Implications in Patients with Uveitis

Lyndell L. Lim, Jing Xie, Chyn C. Chua, Tiffany Wong, Lani T. Hoang, Matthias D. Becker, Eric Suhler, James (Jim) Rosenbaum, Friederike Mackensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Keratic precipitates (KP) are a common feature of uveitis. We prospectively examined KP with the Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph II confocal laser scanning microscope and Rostock Corneal Module (HRT-RCM) to explore their diagnostic implications. Methods: Prospective, observational, multicenter study. HRT-RCM images were classified by two masked observers. Results: 120 scans on 120 eyes from 110 subjects were included. The majority (N = 93) had non-infectious uveitis. Sixty eyes had active disease at scanning. Eight KP morphologies were defined. Agreement between the two masked graders was high (Kappa value across all categories = 0.81). Cluster and nodular KP were associated with active infectious uveitis (p < 0.01): patients with cluster KP (odds ratio [OR] = 3.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.43, 6.45) and nodular KP (OR = 3.89, 95% CI: 1.42, 10.65) were more likely to have infectious uveitis than those without. Conclusions: Laser confocal microscopy of KP may have a role in determining between infectious and non-infectious uveitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalOcular Immunology and Inflammation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 28 2017

Fingerprint

Uveitis
Confocal Microscopy
Cornea
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Multicenter Studies
Observational Studies
Lasers
Intravital Microscopy

Keywords

  • Confocal microscopy
  • imaging analysis
  • keratic precipitates
  • uveitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

In Vivo Laser Confocal Microscopy Using the HRT-Rostock Cornea Module : Diversity and Diagnostic Implications in Patients with Uveitis. / Lim, Lyndell L.; Xie, Jing; Chua, Chyn C.; Wong, Tiffany; Hoang, Lani T.; Becker, Matthias D.; Suhler, Eric; Rosenbaum, James (Jim); Mackensen, Friederike.

In: Ocular Immunology and Inflammation, 28.05.2017, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lim, Lyndell L. ; Xie, Jing ; Chua, Chyn C. ; Wong, Tiffany ; Hoang, Lani T. ; Becker, Matthias D. ; Suhler, Eric ; Rosenbaum, James (Jim) ; Mackensen, Friederike. / In Vivo Laser Confocal Microscopy Using the HRT-Rostock Cornea Module : Diversity and Diagnostic Implications in Patients with Uveitis. In: Ocular Immunology and Inflammation. 2017 ; pp. 1-10.
@article{bec5d5c3f83242b68af2f54fa187fb67,
title = "In Vivo Laser Confocal Microscopy Using the HRT-Rostock Cornea Module: Diversity and Diagnostic Implications in Patients with Uveitis",
abstract = "Purpose: Keratic precipitates (KP) are a common feature of uveitis. We prospectively examined KP with the Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph II confocal laser scanning microscope and Rostock Corneal Module (HRT-RCM) to explore their diagnostic implications. Methods: Prospective, observational, multicenter study. HRT-RCM images were classified by two masked observers. Results: 120 scans on 120 eyes from 110 subjects were included. The majority (N = 93) had non-infectious uveitis. Sixty eyes had active disease at scanning. Eight KP morphologies were defined. Agreement between the two masked graders was high (Kappa value across all categories = 0.81). Cluster and nodular KP were associated with active infectious uveitis (p < 0.01): patients with cluster KP (odds ratio [OR] = 3.03, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 1.43, 6.45) and nodular KP (OR = 3.89, 95{\%} CI: 1.42, 10.65) were more likely to have infectious uveitis than those without. Conclusions: Laser confocal microscopy of KP may have a role in determining between infectious and non-infectious uveitis.",
keywords = "Confocal microscopy, imaging analysis, keratic precipitates, uveitis",
author = "Lim, {Lyndell L.} and Jing Xie and Chua, {Chyn C.} and Tiffany Wong and Hoang, {Lani T.} and Becker, {Matthias D.} and Eric Suhler and Rosenbaum, {James (Jim)} and Friederike Mackensen",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1080/09273948.2017.1298818",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--10",
journal = "Ocular Immunology and Inflammation",
issn = "0927-3948",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - In Vivo Laser Confocal Microscopy Using the HRT-Rostock Cornea Module

T2 - Diversity and Diagnostic Implications in Patients with Uveitis

AU - Lim, Lyndell L.

AU - Xie, Jing

AU - Chua, Chyn C.

AU - Wong, Tiffany

AU - Hoang, Lani T.

AU - Becker, Matthias D.

AU - Suhler, Eric

AU - Rosenbaum, James (Jim)

AU - Mackensen, Friederike

PY - 2017/5/28

Y1 - 2017/5/28

N2 - Purpose: Keratic precipitates (KP) are a common feature of uveitis. We prospectively examined KP with the Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph II confocal laser scanning microscope and Rostock Corneal Module (HRT-RCM) to explore their diagnostic implications. Methods: Prospective, observational, multicenter study. HRT-RCM images were classified by two masked observers. Results: 120 scans on 120 eyes from 110 subjects were included. The majority (N = 93) had non-infectious uveitis. Sixty eyes had active disease at scanning. Eight KP morphologies were defined. Agreement between the two masked graders was high (Kappa value across all categories = 0.81). Cluster and nodular KP were associated with active infectious uveitis (p < 0.01): patients with cluster KP (odds ratio [OR] = 3.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.43, 6.45) and nodular KP (OR = 3.89, 95% CI: 1.42, 10.65) were more likely to have infectious uveitis than those without. Conclusions: Laser confocal microscopy of KP may have a role in determining between infectious and non-infectious uveitis.

AB - Purpose: Keratic precipitates (KP) are a common feature of uveitis. We prospectively examined KP with the Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph II confocal laser scanning microscope and Rostock Corneal Module (HRT-RCM) to explore their diagnostic implications. Methods: Prospective, observational, multicenter study. HRT-RCM images were classified by two masked observers. Results: 120 scans on 120 eyes from 110 subjects were included. The majority (N = 93) had non-infectious uveitis. Sixty eyes had active disease at scanning. Eight KP morphologies were defined. Agreement between the two masked graders was high (Kappa value across all categories = 0.81). Cluster and nodular KP were associated with active infectious uveitis (p < 0.01): patients with cluster KP (odds ratio [OR] = 3.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.43, 6.45) and nodular KP (OR = 3.89, 95% CI: 1.42, 10.65) were more likely to have infectious uveitis than those without. Conclusions: Laser confocal microscopy of KP may have a role in determining between infectious and non-infectious uveitis.

KW - Confocal microscopy

KW - imaging analysis

KW - keratic precipitates

KW - uveitis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020069694&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020069694&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/09273948.2017.1298818

DO - 10.1080/09273948.2017.1298818

M3 - Article

C2 - 28562149

AN - SCOPUS:85020069694

SP - 1

EP - 10

JO - Ocular Immunology and Inflammation

JF - Ocular Immunology and Inflammation

SN - 0927-3948

ER -