In vivo confocal microscopy of keratic precipitates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the heterogeneity of keratic precipitates (KP) in varying subtypes of uveitis by in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Methods: The KP were viewed with a scanning confocal microscope in patients (n = 33) who sought care at a tertiary referral uveitis service for immune-mediated and infectious forms of uveitis, including HLA-B27-associated uveitis, sarcoidosis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, juvenile chronic arthritis, Fuchs heterochromic iridocyclitis, cytomegalovirus retinitis, herpes zoster ophthalmicus, ocular toxoplasmosis, and idiopathic uveitis. Images were captured and digitalized in real time. Results: Forty-two eyes of 33 patients were examined in this study. Patient age ranged from 22 to 84 years, with a mean age of 49.4 years. Seventeen (52%) of the patients were women, and 16 patients (48%) were men. The KP ranged in diameter from 10 to 350 μm. We observed the following absolute and speculative outcomes: KP are markedly heterogeneous and variable as documented by IVCM; KP in individual patients are consistent throughout the cornea; the morphologic features of KP change across time; infectious vs noninfectious causes of uveitis seem to be readily distinguishable by using IVCM; and KP may have consistency for specific disease states and therefore may have diagnostic importance. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first time that IVCM has been used to describe the architecture and heterogeneity of KP in uveitis. Such observations reveal a heterogeneity that could not be appreciated by conventional slitlamp microscopy and may have diagnostic relevance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1773-1781
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume122
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004

Fingerprint

Uveitis
Confocal Microscopy
Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus
Ocular Toxoplasmosis
Uveomeningoencephalitic Syndrome
Iridocyclitis
Cytomegalovirus Retinitis
HLA-B27 Antigen
Juvenile Arthritis
Sarcoidosis
Intravital Microscopy
Cornea
Microscopy
Referral and Consultation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

In vivo confocal microscopy of keratic precipitates. / Wertheim, Michael S.; Mathers, William; Planck, Stephen; Martin, Tammy; Suhler, Eric; Smith, Justine R.; Rosenbaum, James (Jim).

In: Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol. 122, No. 12, 12.2004, p. 1773-1781.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d72246136ee14834bb34810396364626,
title = "In vivo confocal microscopy of keratic precipitates",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the heterogeneity of keratic precipitates (KP) in varying subtypes of uveitis by in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Methods: The KP were viewed with a scanning confocal microscope in patients (n = 33) who sought care at a tertiary referral uveitis service for immune-mediated and infectious forms of uveitis, including HLA-B27-associated uveitis, sarcoidosis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, juvenile chronic arthritis, Fuchs heterochromic iridocyclitis, cytomegalovirus retinitis, herpes zoster ophthalmicus, ocular toxoplasmosis, and idiopathic uveitis. Images were captured and digitalized in real time. Results: Forty-two eyes of 33 patients were examined in this study. Patient age ranged from 22 to 84 years, with a mean age of 49.4 years. Seventeen (52{\%}) of the patients were women, and 16 patients (48{\%}) were men. The KP ranged in diameter from 10 to 350 μm. We observed the following absolute and speculative outcomes: KP are markedly heterogeneous and variable as documented by IVCM; KP in individual patients are consistent throughout the cornea; the morphologic features of KP change across time; infectious vs noninfectious causes of uveitis seem to be readily distinguishable by using IVCM; and KP may have consistency for specific disease states and therefore may have diagnostic importance. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first time that IVCM has been used to describe the architecture and heterogeneity of KP in uveitis. Such observations reveal a heterogeneity that could not be appreciated by conventional slitlamp microscopy and may have diagnostic relevance.",
author = "Wertheim, {Michael S.} and William Mathers and Stephen Planck and Tammy Martin and Eric Suhler and Smith, {Justine R.} and Rosenbaum, {James (Jim)}",
year = "2004",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1001/archopht.122.12.1773",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "122",
pages = "1773--1781",
journal = "JAMA Ophthalmology",
issn = "2168-6165",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - In vivo confocal microscopy of keratic precipitates

AU - Wertheim, Michael S.

AU - Mathers, William

AU - Planck, Stephen

AU - Martin, Tammy

AU - Suhler, Eric

AU - Smith, Justine R.

AU - Rosenbaum, James (Jim)

PY - 2004/12

Y1 - 2004/12

N2 - Objective: To evaluate the heterogeneity of keratic precipitates (KP) in varying subtypes of uveitis by in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Methods: The KP were viewed with a scanning confocal microscope in patients (n = 33) who sought care at a tertiary referral uveitis service for immune-mediated and infectious forms of uveitis, including HLA-B27-associated uveitis, sarcoidosis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, juvenile chronic arthritis, Fuchs heterochromic iridocyclitis, cytomegalovirus retinitis, herpes zoster ophthalmicus, ocular toxoplasmosis, and idiopathic uveitis. Images were captured and digitalized in real time. Results: Forty-two eyes of 33 patients were examined in this study. Patient age ranged from 22 to 84 years, with a mean age of 49.4 years. Seventeen (52%) of the patients were women, and 16 patients (48%) were men. The KP ranged in diameter from 10 to 350 μm. We observed the following absolute and speculative outcomes: KP are markedly heterogeneous and variable as documented by IVCM; KP in individual patients are consistent throughout the cornea; the morphologic features of KP change across time; infectious vs noninfectious causes of uveitis seem to be readily distinguishable by using IVCM; and KP may have consistency for specific disease states and therefore may have diagnostic importance. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first time that IVCM has been used to describe the architecture and heterogeneity of KP in uveitis. Such observations reveal a heterogeneity that could not be appreciated by conventional slitlamp microscopy and may have diagnostic relevance.

AB - Objective: To evaluate the heterogeneity of keratic precipitates (KP) in varying subtypes of uveitis by in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Methods: The KP were viewed with a scanning confocal microscope in patients (n = 33) who sought care at a tertiary referral uveitis service for immune-mediated and infectious forms of uveitis, including HLA-B27-associated uveitis, sarcoidosis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, juvenile chronic arthritis, Fuchs heterochromic iridocyclitis, cytomegalovirus retinitis, herpes zoster ophthalmicus, ocular toxoplasmosis, and idiopathic uveitis. Images were captured and digitalized in real time. Results: Forty-two eyes of 33 patients were examined in this study. Patient age ranged from 22 to 84 years, with a mean age of 49.4 years. Seventeen (52%) of the patients were women, and 16 patients (48%) were men. The KP ranged in diameter from 10 to 350 μm. We observed the following absolute and speculative outcomes: KP are markedly heterogeneous and variable as documented by IVCM; KP in individual patients are consistent throughout the cornea; the morphologic features of KP change across time; infectious vs noninfectious causes of uveitis seem to be readily distinguishable by using IVCM; and KP may have consistency for specific disease states and therefore may have diagnostic importance. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first time that IVCM has been used to describe the architecture and heterogeneity of KP in uveitis. Such observations reveal a heterogeneity that could not be appreciated by conventional slitlamp microscopy and may have diagnostic relevance.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=10044242347&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=10044242347&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/archopht.122.12.1773

DO - 10.1001/archopht.122.12.1773

M3 - Article

C2 - 15596579

AN - SCOPUS:10044242347

VL - 122

SP - 1773

EP - 1781

JO - JAMA Ophthalmology

JF - JAMA Ophthalmology

SN - 2168-6165

IS - 12

ER -