In vivo assembly of the proteasomal complexes, implications for antigen processing

Y. Yang, Klaus Frueh, K. Ahn, P. A. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The multicatalytic and multisubunit proteasomal complexes have been implicated in the processing of antigens to peptides presented by class I major histocompatibility complex molecules. Two structural complexes of this proteinase, 20 S and 26 S proteasomes, have been isolated from cells. By analyzing in vivo assembly of the proteasomal complexes we show that the 20 S proteasomal complexes are irreversibly assembled via 15 S assembly intermediates containing unprocessed β-type subunits. The 20 S proteasomes further associate reversibly with proteasome activators PA28 or pre-existing ATPase complexes to form 26 S proteasomal complexes. Our findings that not all of the 20 S proteasomal complexes are assembled into 26 S proteasomal complexes within cells and that all of PA28 and ATPase complexes are associated with 20 S proteasomes strongly suggest that all proteasomal complexes coexist within cells. We further demonstrate that 26 S proteasomal complexes are predominantly present in the cytoplasm and a significant portion of the 20 S proteasomal complexes is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Taken together, our findings suggest that depending upon their associated regulatory components, 26 S and 20 S-PA28 proteasomal complexes serve different housekeeping functions within the cells, while they degrade antigens in a cooperative manner in antigen processing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27687-27694
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume270
Issue number46
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Antigen Presentation
Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex
Antigens
Processing
Adenosine Triphosphatases
Housekeeping
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Endoplasmic Reticulum
Cytoplasm
Peptide Hydrolases
Membranes
Peptides
Molecules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

In vivo assembly of the proteasomal complexes, implications for antigen processing. / Yang, Y.; Frueh, Klaus; Ahn, K.; Peterson, P. A.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 270, No. 46, 1995, p. 27687-27694.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Y. ; Frueh, Klaus ; Ahn, K. ; Peterson, P. A. / In vivo assembly of the proteasomal complexes, implications for antigen processing. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 1995 ; Vol. 270, No. 46. pp. 27687-27694.
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