In vivo analysis in Drosophila reveals differential requirements of contact residues in Axin for interactions with GSK3β or β-catenin

Susan A. Kremer, Naz Erdeniz, Wynne Peterson-Nedry, Elizabeth A. Swanson, Marcel Wehrli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Proper regulation of the Wingless/Wnt signaling pathway is essential for normal development. The scaffolding protein Axin plays a key role in this process through interactions with Drosophila Shaggy and Armadillo. In the current studies, we used a yeast two-hybrid assay to identify ten amino acids in Axin that are critical for in vitro interaction with Shaggy and two for interaction with Armadillo. We then generated five Axin variants in which individual putative contact amino acids were mutated and compared their activity, as assayed by rescue of axin null mutant flies, to that of Axin lacking the entire Shaggy (AxinΔSgg) or Armadillo (AxinΔArm) binding domain. Although we expected these mutants to function identically to Axin in which the entire binding domain was deleted, we instead observed a spectrum of phenotypic rescue. Specifically, two point mutants within the Shaggy binding domain showed loss of activity similar to that of AxinΔSgg and dominantly interfered with complex function, whereas a third mutant allele, AxinK446E, retained most function. Two Axin point mutants within the Armadillo binding domain were weak alleles and retained most function. These findings demonstrate the importance of in vivo verification of the role of specific amino acids within a protein.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-123
Number of pages14
JournalDevelopmental Biology
Volume337
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Keywords

  • Axin mutations
  • Cancer
  • Drosophila
  • In vivo analysis
  • Wnt/β-catenin signaling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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