Importance of First and Second Authorship in Assessing Citation-Based Scholarly Activity of US Radiation Oncology Residents and Subsequent Choice of Academic Versus Private Practice Career

Shearwood McClelland, Timur Mitin, Reshma Jagsi, Charles Thomas, Jerry Jaboin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The Hirsch index (h-index) has been shown to correlate with radiation oncology residents’ having a first job in academics versus private practice, but it is limited by its inability to distinguish between the differing significance of coauthor roles in articles. Methods: A list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates and their postresidency career choices was compiled. The Scopus bibliometric citation database was then searched to collect h-index data for articles limited to first author only (hf) and first or second-author only (hs) for each resident. Results: Mean hf was 2.06 for all resident graduates, and mean hs was 2.77. Residents with PhDs had significantly higher hf (3.11 versus 1.76, P < .01) and hs (4.50 versus 2.28, P < .01). There was no statistically significant difference between male and female residents for hf (2.19 versus 1.61, P = .11) or hs (2.91 versus 2.25, P = .15). Residents choosing academia had higher hf (2.72 versus 1.44, P < .01) and hs (3.57 versus 2.01, P < 0.01) than those in private practice. Fewer than 20% of graduates with hf = 0 and only 10% of graduates with hs = 0 secured academic jobs. Conclusion: The average radiation oncology resident graduate has published a minimum of two first- and/or second-author articles cited at least twice. Graduates with PhDs and/or choosing academic careers were more likely to have higher hf and hs scores; there was no significant score difference by gender. Only 10% of graduates without any first- and/or second-author articles cited at least once secured academic jobs. These findings indicate that stratifying publications by first or second authorship when developing benchmarks for evaluating resident productivity and postresidency career type may be useful.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American College of Radiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Authorship
Radiation Oncology
Private Practice
Bibliometrics
Career Choice
Benchmarking
Publications
Databases

Keywords

  • academic radiation oncology
  • First authorship
  • h-index
  • radiation oncology residency graduates
  • second authorship

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

@article{5f767ef2ef994b7aa00e9febb5c6da4f,
title = "Importance of First and Second Authorship in Assessing Citation-Based Scholarly Activity of US Radiation Oncology Residents and Subsequent Choice of Academic Versus Private Practice Career",
abstract = "Purpose: The Hirsch index (h-index) has been shown to correlate with radiation oncology residents’ having a first job in academics versus private practice, but it is limited by its inability to distinguish between the differing significance of coauthor roles in articles. Methods: A list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates and their postresidency career choices was compiled. The Scopus bibliometric citation database was then searched to collect h-index data for articles limited to first author only (hf) and first or second-author only (hs) for each resident. Results: Mean hf was 2.06 for all resident graduates, and mean hs was 2.77. Residents with PhDs had significantly higher hf (3.11 versus 1.76, P < .01) and hs (4.50 versus 2.28, P < .01). There was no statistically significant difference between male and female residents for hf (2.19 versus 1.61, P = .11) or hs (2.91 versus 2.25, P = .15). Residents choosing academia had higher hf (2.72 versus 1.44, P < .01) and hs (3.57 versus 2.01, P < 0.01) than those in private practice. Fewer than 20{\%} of graduates with hf = 0 and only 10{\%} of graduates with hs = 0 secured academic jobs. Conclusion: The average radiation oncology resident graduate has published a minimum of two first- and/or second-author articles cited at least twice. Graduates with PhDs and/or choosing academic careers were more likely to have higher hf and hs scores; there was no significant score difference by gender. Only 10{\%} of graduates without any first- and/or second-author articles cited at least once secured academic jobs. These findings indicate that stratifying publications by first or second authorship when developing benchmarks for evaluating resident productivity and postresidency career type may be useful.",
keywords = "academic radiation oncology, First authorship, h-index, radiation oncology residency graduates, second authorship",
author = "Shearwood McClelland and Timur Mitin and Reshma Jagsi and Charles Thomas and Jerry Jaboin",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jacr.2018.05.015",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of the American College of Radiology",
issn = "1558-349X",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

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T1 - Importance of First and Second Authorship in Assessing Citation-Based Scholarly Activity of US Radiation Oncology Residents and Subsequent Choice of Academic Versus Private Practice Career

AU - McClelland, Shearwood

AU - Mitin, Timur

AU - Jagsi, Reshma

AU - Thomas, Charles

AU - Jaboin, Jerry

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Purpose: The Hirsch index (h-index) has been shown to correlate with radiation oncology residents’ having a first job in academics versus private practice, but it is limited by its inability to distinguish between the differing significance of coauthor roles in articles. Methods: A list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates and their postresidency career choices was compiled. The Scopus bibliometric citation database was then searched to collect h-index data for articles limited to first author only (hf) and first or second-author only (hs) for each resident. Results: Mean hf was 2.06 for all resident graduates, and mean hs was 2.77. Residents with PhDs had significantly higher hf (3.11 versus 1.76, P < .01) and hs (4.50 versus 2.28, P < .01). There was no statistically significant difference between male and female residents for hf (2.19 versus 1.61, P = .11) or hs (2.91 versus 2.25, P = .15). Residents choosing academia had higher hf (2.72 versus 1.44, P < .01) and hs (3.57 versus 2.01, P < 0.01) than those in private practice. Fewer than 20% of graduates with hf = 0 and only 10% of graduates with hs = 0 secured academic jobs. Conclusion: The average radiation oncology resident graduate has published a minimum of two first- and/or second-author articles cited at least twice. Graduates with PhDs and/or choosing academic careers were more likely to have higher hf and hs scores; there was no significant score difference by gender. Only 10% of graduates without any first- and/or second-author articles cited at least once secured academic jobs. These findings indicate that stratifying publications by first or second authorship when developing benchmarks for evaluating resident productivity and postresidency career type may be useful.

AB - Purpose: The Hirsch index (h-index) has been shown to correlate with radiation oncology residents’ having a first job in academics versus private practice, but it is limited by its inability to distinguish between the differing significance of coauthor roles in articles. Methods: A list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates and their postresidency career choices was compiled. The Scopus bibliometric citation database was then searched to collect h-index data for articles limited to first author only (hf) and first or second-author only (hs) for each resident. Results: Mean hf was 2.06 for all resident graduates, and mean hs was 2.77. Residents with PhDs had significantly higher hf (3.11 versus 1.76, P < .01) and hs (4.50 versus 2.28, P < .01). There was no statistically significant difference between male and female residents for hf (2.19 versus 1.61, P = .11) or hs (2.91 versus 2.25, P = .15). Residents choosing academia had higher hf (2.72 versus 1.44, P < .01) and hs (3.57 versus 2.01, P < 0.01) than those in private practice. Fewer than 20% of graduates with hf = 0 and only 10% of graduates with hs = 0 secured academic jobs. Conclusion: The average radiation oncology resident graduate has published a minimum of two first- and/or second-author articles cited at least twice. Graduates with PhDs and/or choosing academic careers were more likely to have higher hf and hs scores; there was no significant score difference by gender. Only 10% of graduates without any first- and/or second-author articles cited at least once secured academic jobs. These findings indicate that stratifying publications by first or second authorship when developing benchmarks for evaluating resident productivity and postresidency career type may be useful.

KW - academic radiation oncology

KW - First authorship

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KW - radiation oncology residency graduates

KW - second authorship

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