Implicit and explicit weight bias in a national sample of 4,732 medical students: The medical student CHANGES study

Sean M. Phelan, John F. Dovidio, Rebecca M. Puhl, Diana J. Burgess, David B. Nelson, Mark W. Yeazel, Rachel Hardeman, Sylvia Perry, Michelle van Ryn

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To examine the magnitude of explicit and implicit weight biases compared to biases against other groups; and identify student factors predicting bias in a large national sample of medical students. Methods A web-based survey was completed by 4,732 1st year medical students from 49 medical schools as part of a longitudinal study of medical education. The survey included a validated measure of implicit weight bias, the implicit association test, and 2 measures of explicit bias: a feeling thermometer and the anti-fat attitudes test. Results A majority of students exhibited implicit (74%) and explicit (67%) weight bias. Implicit weight bias scores were comparable to reported bias against racial minorities. Explicit attitudes were more negative toward obese people than toward racial minorities, gays, lesbians, and poor people. In multivariate regression models, implicit and explicit weight bias was predicted by lower BMI, male sex, and non-Black race. Either implicit or explicit bias was also predicted by age, SES, country of birth, and specialty choice. Conclusions Implicit and explicit weight bias is common among 1st year medical students, and varies across student factors. Future research should assess implications of biases and test interventions to reduce their impact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1201-1208
Number of pages8
JournalObesity
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medical Students
Weights and Measures
Students
Thermometers
Racism
Medical Education
Medical Schools
Longitudinal Studies
Emotions
Fats
Parturition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Phelan, S. M., Dovidio, J. F., Puhl, R. M., Burgess, D. J., Nelson, D. B., Yeazel, M. W., ... van Ryn, M. (2014). Implicit and explicit weight bias in a national sample of 4,732 medical students: The medical student CHANGES study. Obesity, 22(4), 1201-1208. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.20687

Implicit and explicit weight bias in a national sample of 4,732 medical students : The medical student CHANGES study. / Phelan, Sean M.; Dovidio, John F.; Puhl, Rebecca M.; Burgess, Diana J.; Nelson, David B.; Yeazel, Mark W.; Hardeman, Rachel; Perry, Sylvia; van Ryn, Michelle.

In: Obesity, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 1201-1208.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Phelan, SM, Dovidio, JF, Puhl, RM, Burgess, DJ, Nelson, DB, Yeazel, MW, Hardeman, R, Perry, S & van Ryn, M 2014, 'Implicit and explicit weight bias in a national sample of 4,732 medical students: The medical student CHANGES study', Obesity, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 1201-1208. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.20687
Phelan SM, Dovidio JF, Puhl RM, Burgess DJ, Nelson DB, Yeazel MW et al. Implicit and explicit weight bias in a national sample of 4,732 medical students: The medical student CHANGES study. Obesity. 2014 Jan 1;22(4):1201-1208. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.20687
Phelan, Sean M. ; Dovidio, John F. ; Puhl, Rebecca M. ; Burgess, Diana J. ; Nelson, David B. ; Yeazel, Mark W. ; Hardeman, Rachel ; Perry, Sylvia ; van Ryn, Michelle. / Implicit and explicit weight bias in a national sample of 4,732 medical students : The medical student CHANGES study. In: Obesity. 2014 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 1201-1208.
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