Impaired memory and reduced sensitivity to the circadian period lengthening effects of methamphetamine in mice selected for high methamphetamine consumption

Reid H J Olsen, Charles Allen, Victor A. Derkach, Tamara Phillips, John Belknap, Jacob Raber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drug abuse runs in families suggesting the involvement of genetic risk factors. Differences in addiction-related neurobiological systems, including learning and memory and circadian rhythms, may exist prior to developing addiction. We characterized the cognitive phenotypes and the free-running circadian period of mouse lines selectively bred for high methamphetamine (MA) drinking (MA high drinking or MAHDR) and low MA drinking (MA low drinking or MALDR). MA-naïve MALDR mice showed spatial memory retention while MAHDR mice did not. MA-naïve MAHDR mice had elevated hippocampal levels of the AMPA receptor subunits GluA2 (old terminology: GluR2), but not GluA1 (old terminology: GluR1). There were no line differences in the free running period (. τ) when only water was available. During a 25. mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), there was an increase in τ in MALDR but not MAHDR mice, although MAHDR mice consumed significantly more MA. During a 50. mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), both lines showed an increased τ. There was a positive correlation between MA consumption and τ from baseline in MALDR, but not MAHDR, mice. Thus, a heritable proclivity for elevated MA self-administration may be associated with impairments in hippocampus-dependent memory and reduced sensitivity to effects of MA on lengthening of the circadian period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-204
Number of pages8
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume256
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Fingerprint

Methamphetamine
Drinking
Water
Self Administration
AMPA Receptors
Circadian Rhythm
Terminology
Substance-Related Disorders
Hippocampus
Learning

Keywords

  • Circadian
  • GluA1/2
  • Glutamate receptors
  • Methamphetamine
  • Spatial memory
  • Water maze

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{85c07895cde54bc0acfec2b82f88f675,
title = "Impaired memory and reduced sensitivity to the circadian period lengthening effects of methamphetamine in mice selected for high methamphetamine consumption",
abstract = "Drug abuse runs in families suggesting the involvement of genetic risk factors. Differences in addiction-related neurobiological systems, including learning and memory and circadian rhythms, may exist prior to developing addiction. We characterized the cognitive phenotypes and the free-running circadian period of mouse lines selectively bred for high methamphetamine (MA) drinking (MA high drinking or MAHDR) and low MA drinking (MA low drinking or MALDR). MA-na{\"i}ve MALDR mice showed spatial memory retention while MAHDR mice did not. MA-na{\"i}ve MAHDR mice had elevated hippocampal levels of the AMPA receptor subunits GluA2 (old terminology: GluR2), but not GluA1 (old terminology: GluR1). There were no line differences in the free running period (. τ) when only water was available. During a 25. mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), there was an increase in τ in MALDR but not MAHDR mice, although MAHDR mice consumed significantly more MA. During a 50. mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), both lines showed an increased τ. There was a positive correlation between MA consumption and τ from baseline in MALDR, but not MAHDR, mice. Thus, a heritable proclivity for elevated MA self-administration may be associated with impairments in hippocampus-dependent memory and reduced sensitivity to effects of MA on lengthening of the circadian period.",
keywords = "Circadian, GluA1/2, Glutamate receptors, Methamphetamine, Spatial memory, Water maze",
author = "Olsen, {Reid H J} and Charles Allen and Derkach, {Victor A.} and Tamara Phillips and John Belknap and Jacob Raber",
year = "2013",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.bbr.2013.08.015",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "256",
pages = "197--204",
journal = "Behavioural Brain Research",
issn = "0166-4328",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impaired memory and reduced sensitivity to the circadian period lengthening effects of methamphetamine in mice selected for high methamphetamine consumption

AU - Olsen, Reid H J

AU - Allen, Charles

AU - Derkach, Victor A.

AU - Phillips, Tamara

AU - Belknap, John

AU - Raber, Jacob

PY - 2013/11/1

Y1 - 2013/11/1

N2 - Drug abuse runs in families suggesting the involvement of genetic risk factors. Differences in addiction-related neurobiological systems, including learning and memory and circadian rhythms, may exist prior to developing addiction. We characterized the cognitive phenotypes and the free-running circadian period of mouse lines selectively bred for high methamphetamine (MA) drinking (MA high drinking or MAHDR) and low MA drinking (MA low drinking or MALDR). MA-naïve MALDR mice showed spatial memory retention while MAHDR mice did not. MA-naïve MAHDR mice had elevated hippocampal levels of the AMPA receptor subunits GluA2 (old terminology: GluR2), but not GluA1 (old terminology: GluR1). There were no line differences in the free running period (. τ) when only water was available. During a 25. mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), there was an increase in τ in MALDR but not MAHDR mice, although MAHDR mice consumed significantly more MA. During a 50. mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), both lines showed an increased τ. There was a positive correlation between MA consumption and τ from baseline in MALDR, but not MAHDR, mice. Thus, a heritable proclivity for elevated MA self-administration may be associated with impairments in hippocampus-dependent memory and reduced sensitivity to effects of MA on lengthening of the circadian period.

AB - Drug abuse runs in families suggesting the involvement of genetic risk factors. Differences in addiction-related neurobiological systems, including learning and memory and circadian rhythms, may exist prior to developing addiction. We characterized the cognitive phenotypes and the free-running circadian period of mouse lines selectively bred for high methamphetamine (MA) drinking (MA high drinking or MAHDR) and low MA drinking (MA low drinking or MALDR). MA-naïve MALDR mice showed spatial memory retention while MAHDR mice did not. MA-naïve MAHDR mice had elevated hippocampal levels of the AMPA receptor subunits GluA2 (old terminology: GluR2), but not GluA1 (old terminology: GluR1). There were no line differences in the free running period (. τ) when only water was available. During a 25. mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), there was an increase in τ in MALDR but not MAHDR mice, although MAHDR mice consumed significantly more MA. During a 50. mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), both lines showed an increased τ. There was a positive correlation between MA consumption and τ from baseline in MALDR, but not MAHDR, mice. Thus, a heritable proclivity for elevated MA self-administration may be associated with impairments in hippocampus-dependent memory and reduced sensitivity to effects of MA on lengthening of the circadian period.

KW - Circadian

KW - GluA1/2

KW - Glutamate receptors

KW - Methamphetamine

KW - Spatial memory

KW - Water maze

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84883273467&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84883273467&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bbr.2013.08.015

DO - 10.1016/j.bbr.2013.08.015

M3 - Article

C2 - 23954232

AN - SCOPUS:84883273467

VL - 256

SP - 197

EP - 204

JO - Behavioural Brain Research

JF - Behavioural Brain Research

SN - 0166-4328

ER -