Impaired adaptation to renal mass reduction in the polycystic rat

Sung Hak Kang, Terry T. Oyama, Thomas M. Kennefick, Michele M. Thompson, Sharon Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a serious cause of renal failure. In many renal-disease models, surgical renal mass reduction accelerates disease progression. We explored whether surgical renal mass reduction and the method of renal mass reduction accelerate the course of ADPKD. Studies were conducted in male heterozygous cystic Hen:SPRD rats and unaffected littermate controls. Control and cystic rats were subjected to 50% renal mass reduction by uninephrectomy, 50% renal mass reduction by infarction of half of each kidney, or sham operation. Most groups were followed up to the age of 20 weeks, with serial measurements of blood pressure and proteinuria. At 20 weeks, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF) rate were measured. Similar studies to 12 weeks of age were performed in additional groups of control and cystic rats with either sham operation or 50% renal infarction. In noncystic rats, uninephrectomy led to minimal effects on blood pressure and proteinuria and to substantial compensatory renal hypertrophy, hyperfiltration, and hyperperfusion. Similar renal mass reduction by segmental infarction led to greater values for blood pressure and proteinuria and significant compensatory hyperfiltration. In contrast, the cystic rats showed a significant reduction in baseline renal blood flow, more profound increases in blood pressure and proteinuria, and no compensatory increases in GFR and RPF after reduction of renal mass. These studies suggest that the ability of cystic kidneys to respond to acquired loss of nephrons is impaired and that these kidneys are at greater risk when additional renal injury is superimposed. (C) 2000 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)923-929
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Kidney Diseases
Volume35
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Kidney
Proteinuria
Infarction
Blood Pressure
Renal Plasma Flow
Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Cystic Kidney Diseases
Anatomic Models
Renal Circulation
Nephrons
Hypertrophy
Renal Insufficiency
Disease Progression
Control Groups
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Hypertension
  • Polycystic kidney disease (PKD)
  • Proteinuria
  • Renal ablation
  • Uninephrectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Kang, S. H., Oyama, T. T., Kennefick, T. M., Thompson, M. M., & Anderson, S. (2000). Impaired adaptation to renal mass reduction in the polycystic rat. American Journal of Kidney Diseases, 35(5), 923-929.

Impaired adaptation to renal mass reduction in the polycystic rat. / Kang, Sung Hak; Oyama, Terry T.; Kennefick, Thomas M.; Thompson, Michele M.; Anderson, Sharon.

In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Vol. 35, No. 5, 2000, p. 923-929.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kang, SH, Oyama, TT, Kennefick, TM, Thompson, MM & Anderson, S 2000, 'Impaired adaptation to renal mass reduction in the polycystic rat', American Journal of Kidney Diseases, vol. 35, no. 5, pp. 923-929.
Kang, Sung Hak ; Oyama, Terry T. ; Kennefick, Thomas M. ; Thompson, Michele M. ; Anderson, Sharon. / Impaired adaptation to renal mass reduction in the polycystic rat. In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases. 2000 ; Vol. 35, No. 5. pp. 923-929.
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