Impact of the 80-hour resident work week on mortality and morbidity in trauma patients

Karen Brasel, Paola Fata, Timothy C. Flynn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Question: Has the implementation of the resident work hours restriction of 80 hours per week impacted on mortality of injured patients and the resources used to care for them? Design: Retrospective cohort study. Data source: National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) version 6.2. Results: Overall mortality decreased from 4.64% in the pre-80 hour work week to 4.46% in the post-80 hour week (p <0.001). Of particular interest were the differences in outcomes observed in academic versus non - aca demic institutions. In university hospitals, the mortality decreased from 5.16% to 5.03% (p = 0.03), whereas in nonteaching hospitals, mortality increased from 3.38% to 3.85% (p <0.001). There were also small but statistically significant improvements seen in secondary outcomes during the post-80 hour work week. Conclusion: The 80-hour work week has not resulted in significant deteri - oration in the outcome of injured patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-206
Number of pages3
JournalCanadian Journal of Surgery
Volume56
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Morbidity
Mortality
Wounds and Injuries
Hospital Mortality
Information Storage and Retrieval
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Impact of the 80-hour resident work week on mortality and morbidity in trauma patients. / Brasel, Karen; Fata, Paola; Flynn, Timothy C.

In: Canadian Journal of Surgery, Vol. 56, No. 3, 06.2013, p. 204-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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