Impact of infection or vaccination on pre-existing serological memory

Ian J. Amanna, Erika Hammarlund, Mathew W. Lewis, Mark Slifka

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Once established, serum antibody responses against a specific pathogen may last a lifetime. We describe a cohort of four subjects who received smallpox vaccination, and a single subject who received multiple vaccinations, with antibody levels to unrelated antigens monitored for 1-3. years. These immunizations provided the opportunity to determine if infection/vaccination and the resulting toll-like receptor stimulation would alter antigen-specific serological memory to other antigens, including bacterial toxins (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis) and viruses (yellow fever virus, measles, mumps, rubella, Epstein-Barr virus, and varicella-zoster virus). Our results indicate that serum IgG levels are remarkably stable and infection or vaccination are unlikely to increase or decrease pre-existing antigen-specific antibody responses.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1082-1086
    Number of pages5
    JournalHuman Immunology
    Volume73
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 2012

    Fingerprint

    Vaccination
    Antigens
    Infection
    Antibody Formation
    Yellow fever virus
    Bacterial Toxins
    Mumps
    Human Herpesvirus 3
    Smallpox
    Diphtheria
    Rubella
    Whooping Cough
    Toll-Like Receptors
    Tetanus
    Measles
    Serum
    Human Herpesvirus 4
    Immunization
    Immunoglobulin G
    Viruses

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Immunology
    • Immunology and Allergy

    Cite this

    Impact of infection or vaccination on pre-existing serological memory. / Amanna, Ian J.; Hammarlund, Erika; Lewis, Mathew W.; Slifka, Mark.

    In: Human Immunology, Vol. 73, No. 11, 11.2012, p. 1082-1086.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Amanna, Ian J. ; Hammarlund, Erika ; Lewis, Mathew W. ; Slifka, Mark. / Impact of infection or vaccination on pre-existing serological memory. In: Human Immunology. 2012 ; Vol. 73, No. 11. pp. 1082-1086.
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