Impact of an endovascular program on the operative experience of abdominal aortic aneurysm in vascular fellowship and general surgery residency

Peter H. Lin, Ruth L. Bush, Kresimira Milas, Thomas T. Terramani, Thomas F. Dodson, Changyi Chen, Elliot L. Chaikof, Alan B. Lumsden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This study was performed to determine the impact of an endovascular program (EVP) on open and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) operations in a residency training institution. Methods: Over an 8-year period ending in September 2001, hospital records of all patients undergoing open or endovascular AAA repair were retrospectively reviewed. Data were analyzed to determine the changing patterns of case volume, type of operative repair, and complexity of open repair with regards to the training of both general surgical chief residents and vascular fellows. Results: A total of 849 AAA operations were performed during the study period. The initiation of the EVP in 1997 resulted in a steady increase in the total annual AAA cases (P <0.05), due in part to an increase in endovascular AAA operations despite a decrease in the annual open AAA volume. EVP had a positive impact on the overall operative experience of vascular fellows owing to the large increase in their endovascular AAA experience (annual mean pre-EVP 3 ± 0.8 versus post-EVP 47 ± 9.6, P <0.01). A significant reduction occurred in the vascular fellows' open AAA experience (annual mean pre-EVP 40 ± 12.7 versus post-EVP 19 ± 9.4, P <0.05). EVP did not affect the endovascular AAA experience of general surgery chief residents (annual mean pre-EVP 1 ± 0.8 versus post-EVP 3 ± 1.5, not significant). A significant reduction occurred in chief residents' open AAA experience (annual mean pre-EVP 39 ± 9.7 versus post-EVP 18 ± 7.4, P <0.05). EVP did not affect the operative experience of complex open AAA operations in either vascular fellows or general surgery residents. Conclusions: An endovascular program has a positive impact on the aortic aneurysm practice in an academic institution, as evidenced by the significant increase in annual endovascular AAA cases despite a decrease in open AAA operations. Although vascular fellows continued to maintain sufficient experience in both open and endovascular AAA operations, general surgery chief residents suffered a significant decrease in their open AAA experience. Further evaluation of the residency system is warranted to better optimize the training paradigm of both vascular fellowship and general surgery residency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-193
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume186
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Internship and Residency
Blood Vessels
Hospital Records
Aortic Aneurysm

Keywords

  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm
  • Endovascular therapy
  • Surgery residency
  • Surgical education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Impact of an endovascular program on the operative experience of abdominal aortic aneurysm in vascular fellowship and general surgery residency. / Lin, Peter H.; Bush, Ruth L.; Milas, Kresimira; Terramani, Thomas T.; Dodson, Thomas F.; Chen, Changyi; Chaikof, Elliot L.; Lumsden, Alan B.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 186, No. 2, 08.2003, p. 189-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lin, Peter H. ; Bush, Ruth L. ; Milas, Kresimira ; Terramani, Thomas T. ; Dodson, Thomas F. ; Chen, Changyi ; Chaikof, Elliot L. ; Lumsden, Alan B. / Impact of an endovascular program on the operative experience of abdominal aortic aneurysm in vascular fellowship and general surgery residency. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2003 ; Vol. 186, No. 2. pp. 189-193.
@article{a3f26297ddfc4fea8a156198106d6e93,
title = "Impact of an endovascular program on the operative experience of abdominal aortic aneurysm in vascular fellowship and general surgery residency",
abstract = "Background: This study was performed to determine the impact of an endovascular program (EVP) on open and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) operations in a residency training institution. Methods: Over an 8-year period ending in September 2001, hospital records of all patients undergoing open or endovascular AAA repair were retrospectively reviewed. Data were analyzed to determine the changing patterns of case volume, type of operative repair, and complexity of open repair with regards to the training of both general surgical chief residents and vascular fellows. Results: A total of 849 AAA operations were performed during the study period. The initiation of the EVP in 1997 resulted in a steady increase in the total annual AAA cases (P <0.05), due in part to an increase in endovascular AAA operations despite a decrease in the annual open AAA volume. EVP had a positive impact on the overall operative experience of vascular fellows owing to the large increase in their endovascular AAA experience (annual mean pre-EVP 3 ± 0.8 versus post-EVP 47 ± 9.6, P <0.01). A significant reduction occurred in the vascular fellows' open AAA experience (annual mean pre-EVP 40 ± 12.7 versus post-EVP 19 ± 9.4, P <0.05). EVP did not affect the endovascular AAA experience of general surgery chief residents (annual mean pre-EVP 1 ± 0.8 versus post-EVP 3 ± 1.5, not significant). A significant reduction occurred in chief residents' open AAA experience (annual mean pre-EVP 39 ± 9.7 versus post-EVP 18 ± 7.4, P <0.05). EVP did not affect the operative experience of complex open AAA operations in either vascular fellows or general surgery residents. Conclusions: An endovascular program has a positive impact on the aortic aneurysm practice in an academic institution, as evidenced by the significant increase in annual endovascular AAA cases despite a decrease in open AAA operations. Although vascular fellows continued to maintain sufficient experience in both open and endovascular AAA operations, general surgery chief residents suffered a significant decrease in their open AAA experience. Further evaluation of the residency system is warranted to better optimize the training paradigm of both vascular fellowship and general surgery residency.",
keywords = "Abdominal aortic aneurysm, Endovascular therapy, Surgery residency, Surgical education",
author = "Lin, {Peter H.} and Bush, {Ruth L.} and Kresimira Milas and Terramani, {Thomas T.} and Dodson, {Thomas F.} and Changyi Chen and Chaikof, {Elliot L.} and Lumsden, {Alan B.}",
year = "2003",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1016/S0002-9610(03)00180-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "186",
pages = "189--193",
journal = "American Journal of Surgery",
issn = "0002-9610",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of an endovascular program on the operative experience of abdominal aortic aneurysm in vascular fellowship and general surgery residency

AU - Lin, Peter H.

AU - Bush, Ruth L.

AU - Milas, Kresimira

AU - Terramani, Thomas T.

AU - Dodson, Thomas F.

AU - Chen, Changyi

AU - Chaikof, Elliot L.

AU - Lumsden, Alan B.

PY - 2003/8

Y1 - 2003/8

N2 - Background: This study was performed to determine the impact of an endovascular program (EVP) on open and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) operations in a residency training institution. Methods: Over an 8-year period ending in September 2001, hospital records of all patients undergoing open or endovascular AAA repair were retrospectively reviewed. Data were analyzed to determine the changing patterns of case volume, type of operative repair, and complexity of open repair with regards to the training of both general surgical chief residents and vascular fellows. Results: A total of 849 AAA operations were performed during the study period. The initiation of the EVP in 1997 resulted in a steady increase in the total annual AAA cases (P <0.05), due in part to an increase in endovascular AAA operations despite a decrease in the annual open AAA volume. EVP had a positive impact on the overall operative experience of vascular fellows owing to the large increase in their endovascular AAA experience (annual mean pre-EVP 3 ± 0.8 versus post-EVP 47 ± 9.6, P <0.01). A significant reduction occurred in the vascular fellows' open AAA experience (annual mean pre-EVP 40 ± 12.7 versus post-EVP 19 ± 9.4, P <0.05). EVP did not affect the endovascular AAA experience of general surgery chief residents (annual mean pre-EVP 1 ± 0.8 versus post-EVP 3 ± 1.5, not significant). A significant reduction occurred in chief residents' open AAA experience (annual mean pre-EVP 39 ± 9.7 versus post-EVP 18 ± 7.4, P <0.05). EVP did not affect the operative experience of complex open AAA operations in either vascular fellows or general surgery residents. Conclusions: An endovascular program has a positive impact on the aortic aneurysm practice in an academic institution, as evidenced by the significant increase in annual endovascular AAA cases despite a decrease in open AAA operations. Although vascular fellows continued to maintain sufficient experience in both open and endovascular AAA operations, general surgery chief residents suffered a significant decrease in their open AAA experience. Further evaluation of the residency system is warranted to better optimize the training paradigm of both vascular fellowship and general surgery residency.

AB - Background: This study was performed to determine the impact of an endovascular program (EVP) on open and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) operations in a residency training institution. Methods: Over an 8-year period ending in September 2001, hospital records of all patients undergoing open or endovascular AAA repair were retrospectively reviewed. Data were analyzed to determine the changing patterns of case volume, type of operative repair, and complexity of open repair with regards to the training of both general surgical chief residents and vascular fellows. Results: A total of 849 AAA operations were performed during the study period. The initiation of the EVP in 1997 resulted in a steady increase in the total annual AAA cases (P <0.05), due in part to an increase in endovascular AAA operations despite a decrease in the annual open AAA volume. EVP had a positive impact on the overall operative experience of vascular fellows owing to the large increase in their endovascular AAA experience (annual mean pre-EVP 3 ± 0.8 versus post-EVP 47 ± 9.6, P <0.01). A significant reduction occurred in the vascular fellows' open AAA experience (annual mean pre-EVP 40 ± 12.7 versus post-EVP 19 ± 9.4, P <0.05). EVP did not affect the endovascular AAA experience of general surgery chief residents (annual mean pre-EVP 1 ± 0.8 versus post-EVP 3 ± 1.5, not significant). A significant reduction occurred in chief residents' open AAA experience (annual mean pre-EVP 39 ± 9.7 versus post-EVP 18 ± 7.4, P <0.05). EVP did not affect the operative experience of complex open AAA operations in either vascular fellows or general surgery residents. Conclusions: An endovascular program has a positive impact on the aortic aneurysm practice in an academic institution, as evidenced by the significant increase in annual endovascular AAA cases despite a decrease in open AAA operations. Although vascular fellows continued to maintain sufficient experience in both open and endovascular AAA operations, general surgery chief residents suffered a significant decrease in their open AAA experience. Further evaluation of the residency system is warranted to better optimize the training paradigm of both vascular fellowship and general surgery residency.

KW - Abdominal aortic aneurysm

KW - Endovascular therapy

KW - Surgery residency

KW - Surgical education

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0043162174&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0043162174&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0002-9610(03)00180-6

DO - 10.1016/S0002-9610(03)00180-6

M3 - Article

C2 - 12885616

AN - SCOPUS:0043162174

VL - 186

SP - 189

EP - 193

JO - American Journal of Surgery

JF - American Journal of Surgery

SN - 0002-9610

IS - 2

ER -