IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15 as immuno-modulators during SIV/HIV vaccination and treatment

Amanda Leone, Louis Picker, Donald L. Sodora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens have proven to be effective in controlling active HIV replication, complete recovery of CD4+ T cells does not always occur, even among patients with high level virologic control. Recent advances in understanding the biology of T cell production and homeostasis have created the potential to augment anti-viral therapies with immunotherapies designed to facilitate recovery of the HIV-damaged immune system, in particular, the recovery of CD4+ T cell populations. The common gamma-chain cytokines IIL-2, IL-7 and IL-15 are primary regulators of T cell homeostasis and thus have been considered prime candidate immunotherapeutics, both for increasing T cell levels/function and for augmenting vaccine-elicited viral-specific T cell responses. Recent studies have established that these cytokines have distinct functional roles in immune homeostasis, which focus on specific T cell populations. The ability of these cytokines to provide immunotherapeutic benefit to HIV+ patients will depend on their ability to stably increase or functionally enhance the desired T cell target population without adverse virologic or clinical consequences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-90
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent HIV Research
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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Interleukin-15
Interleukin-7
Interleukin-2
Vaccination
HIV
T-Lymphocytes
Homeostasis
Therapeutics
Cytokines
Viral Vaccines
Health Services Needs and Demand
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
Immunotherapy
Population
Immune System

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15 as immuno-modulators during SIV/HIV vaccination and treatment. / Leone, Amanda; Picker, Louis; Sodora, Donald L.

In: Current HIV Research, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2009, p. 83-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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