Hypertriglyceridemia

management of atherogenic dyslipidemia.

Thomas Bersot, Steven Haffner, William Harris, Kenneth A. Kellick, Charlene M. Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Elevated triglycerides are now considered an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease and continue to be a major risk for acute pancreatitis, especially when levels exceed 1000 mg/dL (SOR: B). Elevated triglycerides are a component of atherogenic dyslipidemia and often signal the presence of other conditions (eg, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus) associated with an increased cardiovascular risk (SOR: A). When evaluating a patient with elevated triglycerides, it is important to be cognizant of all atherogenic lipoproteins to more accurately determine the risk of coronary heart disease (SOR: C). Patients with hypertriglyceridemia should first achieve their low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal, followed by their non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal (SOR: C). Fibrates, niacin, and omega-3 acid ethyl esters are highly effective at reducing triglycerides, while statins are considered moderately efficacious (SOR: A).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe Journal of family practice.
Volume55
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Hypertriglyceridemia
Dyslipidemias
Triglycerides
Coronary Disease
Fibric Acids
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Niacin
Pancreatitis
LDL Cholesterol
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Lipoproteins
Esters
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Bersot, T., Haffner, S., Harris, W., Kellick, K. A., & Morris, C. M. (2006). Hypertriglyceridemia: management of atherogenic dyslipidemia. The Journal of family practice., 55(7).

Hypertriglyceridemia : management of atherogenic dyslipidemia. / Bersot, Thomas; Haffner, Steven; Harris, William; Kellick, Kenneth A.; Morris, Charlene M.

In: The Journal of family practice., Vol. 55, No. 7, 07.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bersot, T, Haffner, S, Harris, W, Kellick, KA & Morris, CM 2006, 'Hypertriglyceridemia: management of atherogenic dyslipidemia.', The Journal of family practice., vol. 55, no. 7.
Bersot T, Haffner S, Harris W, Kellick KA, Morris CM. Hypertriglyceridemia: management of atherogenic dyslipidemia. The Journal of family practice. 2006 Jul;55(7).
Bersot, Thomas ; Haffner, Steven ; Harris, William ; Kellick, Kenneth A. ; Morris, Charlene M. / Hypertriglyceridemia : management of atherogenic dyslipidemia. In: The Journal of family practice. 2006 ; Vol. 55, No. 7.
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