Hyperthermic Treatment of Intraocular Tumors

Paul T. Finger, Samuel Packer, Paul P. Svitra, Robert W. Paglione, Jeremy Chess, Daniel Albert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 5.8-gigahertz (GHz) ophthalmic microwave applicator was used to treat choroidal melanoma (Greene strain) in rabbits. High-frequency electromagnetic radiation provides a favorable dose distribution to induce local hyperthermia in the treatment of intraocular tumors. Heating of the neoplasm, while sparing normal ocular structures, is best accomplished by a transscleral approach. A hyperthermia plaque is placed on the sclera at the base of the intraocular tumor. Contact (resistive) heating and electromagnetic radiation (radiofrequency and microwave) are best suited to a plaque technique. The advantages of electromagnetic heat induction, as compared with contact heating, are twofold: The depth of hyperthermic penetration can be modulated by frequency selection, and the tissues with low water content (sclera) remain relatively unaffected by microwaves. The 5.8-GHz ophthalmic microwave applicator satisfies the requirements for local hyperthermic treatment of intraocular tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1477-1481
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume102
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Microwaves
Heating
Electromagnetic Radiation
Sclera
Neoplasms
Induced Hyperthermia
Electromagnetic Phenomena
Therapeutics
Melanoma
Fever
Hot Temperature
Rabbits
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Finger, P. T., Packer, S., Svitra, P. P., Paglione, R. W., Chess, J., & Albert, D. (1984). Hyperthermic Treatment of Intraocular Tumors. Archives of Ophthalmology, 102(10), 1477-1481. https://doi.org/10.1001/archopht.1984.01040031197017

Hyperthermic Treatment of Intraocular Tumors. / Finger, Paul T.; Packer, Samuel; Svitra, Paul P.; Paglione, Robert W.; Chess, Jeremy; Albert, Daniel.

In: Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol. 102, No. 10, 01.01.1984, p. 1477-1481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Finger, PT, Packer, S, Svitra, PP, Paglione, RW, Chess, J & Albert, D 1984, 'Hyperthermic Treatment of Intraocular Tumors', Archives of Ophthalmology, vol. 102, no. 10, pp. 1477-1481. https://doi.org/10.1001/archopht.1984.01040031197017
Finger PT, Packer S, Svitra PP, Paglione RW, Chess J, Albert D. Hyperthermic Treatment of Intraocular Tumors. Archives of Ophthalmology. 1984 Jan 1;102(10):1477-1481. https://doi.org/10.1001/archopht.1984.01040031197017
Finger, Paul T. ; Packer, Samuel ; Svitra, Paul P. ; Paglione, Robert W. ; Chess, Jeremy ; Albert, Daniel. / Hyperthermic Treatment of Intraocular Tumors. In: Archives of Ophthalmology. 1984 ; Vol. 102, No. 10. pp. 1477-1481.
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