Hyperactivity-inattention symptoms in childhood and substance use in adolescence: The youth gazel cohort

Cédric Galéra, Manuel Pierre Bouvard, Antoine Messiah, Eric Fombonne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This study addresses in both genders the relationship between childhood Hyperactivity-inattention symptoms and subsequent adolescent substance use, while controlling for psychiatric comorbidity, temperament and environmental risk factors. Methods: 916 subjects (421 males, 495 females) aged 7-18 were recruited from the general population and surveyed in 1991 and 1999. Child psychopathology and substance use patterns were evaluated through parent and adolescent self-reports. Multivariate modeling was performed to assess the effects of childhood Hyperactivity-inattention symptoms and other risk factors on adolescent substance use. Results: In males, Hyperactivity-inattention symptoms alone accounted for the risk of subsequent regular cannabis smoking (OR = 3.14, p = 0.03) and subsequent lifetime use of other drugs including stimulants, opiates, inhalants and sedatives (OR = 2.72, p = 0.02). In females, Hyperactivity-inattention symptoms did not independently increase the liability to later substance use. In males, the temperament trait activity was a significant predictor of subsequent regular cannabis smoking (OR = 2.32, p = 0.04). Conclusions: This survey points to a possible specific link between Hyperactivity-inattention symptoms and subsequent cannabis use and experimentation of harder drugs in males.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-37
Number of pages8
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume94
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cannabis
adolescence
childhood
Marijuana Smoking
adolescent
Temperament
Opiate Alkaloids
smoking
drug
psychopathology
comorbidity
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Pharmaceutical Preparations
liability
parents
Psychopathology
Self Report
Psychiatry
Comorbidity
gender

Keywords

  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Childhood
  • Longitudinal cohort
  • Substance use
  • Temperament

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Toxicology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Hyperactivity-inattention symptoms in childhood and substance use in adolescence : The youth gazel cohort. / Galéra, Cédric; Bouvard, Manuel Pierre; Messiah, Antoine; Fombonne, Eric.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 94, No. 1-3, 01.04.2008, p. 30-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Galéra, Cédric ; Bouvard, Manuel Pierre ; Messiah, Antoine ; Fombonne, Eric. / Hyperactivity-inattention symptoms in childhood and substance use in adolescence : The youth gazel cohort. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2008 ; Vol. 94, No. 1-3. pp. 30-37.
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