Hybrid capture 2 is as effective as PCR testing for high-risk human papillomavirus in head and neck cancers

Jody E. Hooper, Jessica F. Hebert, Amy Schilling, Neil D. Gross, Joshua Schindler, James P. Lagowski, Molly Kulesz-Martin, Christopher Corless, Terry Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a common cause of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, especially in young male nonsmokers. Accurately diagnosing HPV-associated oral cancers is important, because they have a better prognosis and may be treated differently than smoking-related oral carcinomas. Various methods have been validated to test for high-risk HPV in cervical tissue samples, and they are in routine clinical use to detect dysplasia before it progresses to invasive disease. Similarly, future screening for HPV-mediated oropharyngeal dysplasia may identify patients before it progresses. Our objective was to compare 4 of these methods in a retrospective series of 87 oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas that had archived fresh-frozen and paraffin-embedded tissue for evaluation. Patient age, sex, smoking history, and tumor location were also recorded. DNA prepared from fresh-frozen tissue was tested for HPV genotypes by multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis, and high-risk HPV screening was carried out using Hybrid Capture 2 and Cervista. Histologic sections were immunostained for p16. HPV-positive outcome was defined as agreement between at least 2 of the 3 genetic tests and used for χ 2 analysis and calculations of diagnostic predictive value. As expected, high-risk HPV-positive oral cancers were most common in the tonsil and base of the tongue (oropharynx) of younger male (55 vs. 65 y) (P=0.0002) nonsmokers (P=0.01). Most positive cases were HPV16 (33/36, 92%). Hybrid Capture 2 and Cervista were as sensitive as polymerase chain reaction and had fewer false positives than p16 immunohistochemical staining.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)266-272
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Immunohistochemistry and Molecular Morphology
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 22 2015

Fingerprint

Head and Neck Neoplasms
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Mouth Neoplasms
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Smoking
Oropharynx
Papillomavirus Infections
Palatine Tonsil
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction
Tongue
Paraffin
History
Genotype
Staining and Labeling
Carcinoma
DNA
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Cervista
  • HPV
  • Hybrid Capture 2
  • oropharyngeal
  • p16
  • PCR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Medical Laboratory Technology
  • Histology

Cite this

Hybrid capture 2 is as effective as PCR testing for high-risk human papillomavirus in head and neck cancers. / Hooper, Jody E.; Hebert, Jessica F.; Schilling, Amy; Gross, Neil D.; Schindler, Joshua; Lagowski, James P.; Kulesz-Martin, Molly; Corless, Christopher; Morgan, Terry.

In: Applied Immunohistochemistry and Molecular Morphology, Vol. 23, No. 4, 22.04.2015, p. 266-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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