Hyaluronan-based polymers in the treatment of osteochondral defects

Luis A. Solchaga, Jung Yoo, Magnus Lundberg, James E. Dennis, Barbara A. Huibregtse, Victor M. Goldberg, Arnold I. Caplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

179 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Articular cartilage in adults has limited ability for self-repair. Some methods devised to augment the natural healing response stimulate some regeneration, but the repair is often incomplete and lacks durability. Hyaluronan-based polymers were tested for their ability to enhance the natural healing response. It is hypothesized that hyaluronan-based polymers recreate an embryonic-like milieu where host progenitor cells can regenerate the damaged articular surface and underlying bone. Osteochondral defects were made on the femoral condyles of 4-month-old rabbits and were left empty or filled with hyaluronan-based polymers. The polymers tested were ACP sponge, made of crosslinked hyaluronan, and HYAFF-11 sponge, made of benzylated hyaluronan. The rabbits were killed 4 and 12 weeks after surgery, and the condyles were processed for histology. All 12-week defects were scored with a 29-point scale, and the scores were compared with a Kruskall-Wallis analysis of variance on ranks. Untreated defects filled with bone tissue up to or beyond the tidemark, and the noncalcified surface layer varied from fibrous to hyaline-like tissue. Four weeks after surgery, defects treated with ACP exhibited bone filling to the level of the tidemark and the surface layer was composed of hyaline-like cartilage well integrated with the adjacent cartilage. At 12 weeks, the specimens had bone beyond the tidemark that was covered with a thin layer of hyaline cartilage. Four weeks after surgery, defects treated with HYAFF-11 contained a rim of chondrogenic cells at the interface of the implant and the host tissue. In general, the 12-week defects exhibited good bone fill and the surface was mainly hyaline cartilage. Treated defects received significantly higher scores than untreated defects (p <0.05), and ACP-treated defects scored significantly higher than HYAFF-11-treated defects (p <0.05). The introduction of these hyaluronan-based polymers into defects provides an appropriate scaffolding and favorable microenvironment for the reparative process. Further work is required to fully assess the long-term outcome of defects treated with these polymers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)773-780
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Research
Volume18
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2000

Fingerprint

Hyaluronic Acid
Polymers
Bone and Bones
Hyaline Cartilage
Porifera
Therapeutics
Rabbits
Hyalin
Articular Cartilage
Thigh
Cartilage
Regeneration
Histology
Analysis of Variance
Stem Cells
Joints
hyaluronic acid benzyl ester

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Solchaga, L. A., Yoo, J., Lundberg, M., Dennis, J. E., Huibregtse, B. A., Goldberg, V. M., & Caplan, A. I. (2000). Hyaluronan-based polymers in the treatment of osteochondral defects. Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 18(5), 773-780.

Hyaluronan-based polymers in the treatment of osteochondral defects. / Solchaga, Luis A.; Yoo, Jung; Lundberg, Magnus; Dennis, James E.; Huibregtse, Barbara A.; Goldberg, Victor M.; Caplan, Arnold I.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, Vol. 18, No. 5, 09.2000, p. 773-780.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Solchaga, LA, Yoo, J, Lundberg, M, Dennis, JE, Huibregtse, BA, Goldberg, VM & Caplan, AI 2000, 'Hyaluronan-based polymers in the treatment of osteochondral defects', Journal of Orthopaedic Research, vol. 18, no. 5, pp. 773-780.
Solchaga LA, Yoo J, Lundberg M, Dennis JE, Huibregtse BA, Goldberg VM et al. Hyaluronan-based polymers in the treatment of osteochondral defects. Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2000 Sep;18(5):773-780.
Solchaga, Luis A. ; Yoo, Jung ; Lundberg, Magnus ; Dennis, James E. ; Huibregtse, Barbara A. ; Goldberg, Victor M. ; Caplan, Arnold I. / Hyaluronan-based polymers in the treatment of osteochondral defects. In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2000 ; Vol. 18, No. 5. pp. 773-780.
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