HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS DETECTED IN BOWEL EPITHELIUM FROM PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL SYMPTOMS

Jay Nelson, Catherine Reynolds-Kohler, William Margaretten, ClaytonA Wiley, CharlesE Reese, JayA Levy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

306 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infectious human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was recovered from two out of four bowel biopsy specimens from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with chronic diarrhoea of unknown aetiology. In-situ hybridisation of biopsy specimens from rectum and duodenum of other AIDS patients with gastrointestinal complaints showed the presence of HIV-infected cells in both the base of the bowel crypts and the lamina propria. The type(s) of epithelial cell(s) infected could not be determined definitively. However, the association of in-situ labelling of HIV RNA in argentaffin staining cells strongly suggests that enterochromaffin cells derived from neural crest tissue are among the target cells. This evidence that HIV can directly infect the bowel raises the possibility that the virus causes some of the gastrointestinal disorders of AIDS patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-262
Number of pages4
JournalThe Lancet
Volume331
Issue number8580
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 6 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Epithelium
HIV
Enterochromaffin Cells
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Biopsy
Neural Crest
Duodenum
Rectum
In Situ Hybridization
Diarrhea
Mucous Membrane
Epithelial Cells
RNA
Staining and Labeling
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS DETECTED IN BOWEL EPITHELIUM FROM PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL SYMPTOMS. / Nelson, Jay; Reynolds-Kohler, Catherine; Margaretten, William; Wiley, ClaytonA; Reese, CharlesE; Levy, JayA.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 331, No. 8580, 06.02.1988, p. 259-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nelson, J, Reynolds-Kohler, C, Margaretten, W, Wiley, C, Reese, C & Levy, J 1988, 'HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS DETECTED IN BOWEL EPITHELIUM FROM PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL SYMPTOMS', The Lancet, vol. 331, no. 8580, pp. 259-262. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(88)90348-0
Nelson, Jay ; Reynolds-Kohler, Catherine ; Margaretten, William ; Wiley, ClaytonA ; Reese, CharlesE ; Levy, JayA. / HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS DETECTED IN BOWEL EPITHELIUM FROM PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL SYMPTOMS. In: The Lancet. 1988 ; Vol. 331, No. 8580. pp. 259-262.
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