Human growth hormone

Who is a candidate for treatment?

Stephen Lafranchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The one accepted indication for human growth hormone (hGH) treatment is classic hGH deficiency, and girls with Turner's syndrome will soon be added to this category. The unlimited supply of recombinant hGH has expanded investigational trials to include many growth disorders and metabolic conditions, but continued investigation and accumulation of information through well-designed and controlled studies are required for these uses. I believe there is no indication to treat short, normally growing children whose predicted adult height is normal for their genetic potential. Physicians must remember that even if only children under the third percentile on growth charts are treated with hGH, a new population will be created that falls below that percentile. Two excellent, recent reviews of current use of hGH therapy are available for further reading on this subject.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-388
Number of pages22
JournalPostgraduate Medicine
Volume91
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Human Growth Hormone
Growth Charts
Growth Disorders
Therapeutics
Turner Syndrome
Only Child
Growth Hormone
Reading
Physicians
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Human growth hormone : Who is a candidate for treatment? / Lafranchi, Stephen.

In: Postgraduate Medicine, Vol. 91, No. 5, 1992, p. 367-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lafranchi, S 1992, 'Human growth hormone: Who is a candidate for treatment?', Postgraduate Medicine, vol. 91, no. 5, pp. 367-388.
Lafranchi, Stephen. / Human growth hormone : Who is a candidate for treatment?. In: Postgraduate Medicine. 1992 ; Vol. 91, No. 5. pp. 367-388.
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