How we diagnose and treat systemic mastocytosis in adults

Robyn M. Scherber, Uma Borate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapid advances in the understanding of the molecular biology, data from translational and clinical trials, and retrospective analyses has influenced the diagnosis and treatment of systemic mastocytosis (SM). Many options have existed for the symptomatic management of SM patients, but recent evolution in regards to the molecular underpinnings of this disease and our ability to distinguish clonal mastocytosis from mast cell activation syndrome has changed our treatment paradigm and opened new opportunities for understanding genetic risk, transformation to mast cell leukaemia, and treatment choices. Key to this change has been the discovery of the KIT mutation and the use of next generation sequencing to evaluate for co-existing molecular mutations that may define the disease course. Careful diagnosis, judicious symptom management and close surveillance of those who may have yet undiagnosed disease is paramount in providing optimal management. In this article, we review the diagnosis and provide a paradigm for the management of SM patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBritish Journal of Haematology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Systemic Mastocytosis
Mast-Cell Leukemia
Mastocytosis
Genetic Transformation
Mutation
Mast Cells
Molecular Biology
Therapeutics
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Imatinib
  • Midostaurin
  • Systemic mastocytosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

How we diagnose and treat systemic mastocytosis in adults. / Scherber, Robyn M.; Borate, Uma.

In: British Journal of Haematology, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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