How tissue optics affect dosimetry for photochemical, photothermal, and photomechanical mechanisms of laser-tissue interaction

Steven L. Jacques

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

The optical properties of tissues determine the penetration into tissue of the radiant energy from a laser (or other light) source. Subsequently, the laser energy is converted to chemical, thermal, or mechanical energy, and a variety of laser-tissue interactions are possible. The initial distribution of the radiant energy, however, affects the distribution and often the nature of the subsequent laser-tissue interactions. In this report, the manner in which optical penetration affects the subsequent photochemical, photothermal, and photomechanical mechanisms of laser-tissue interaction are presented. Understanding the optical dosimetry is an important step in developing protocols for clinical therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherPubl by Int Soc for Optical Engineering
Pages316-322
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)0819407305, 9780819407306
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes
EventRecent Advances in the Uses of Light in Physics, Chemistry, Engineering, and Medicine - New York, NY, USA
Duration: Jun 19 1991Jun 21 1991

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume1599
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Other

OtherRecent Advances in the Uses of Light in Physics, Chemistry, Engineering, and Medicine
CityNew York, NY, USA
Period6/19/916/21/91

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'How tissue optics affect dosimetry for photochemical, photothermal, and photomechanical mechanisms of laser-tissue interaction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Jacques, S. L. (1992). How tissue optics affect dosimetry for photochemical, photothermal, and photomechanical mechanisms of laser-tissue interaction. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (pp. 316-322). (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 1599). Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.56713