How long is too long: Does a prolonged second stage of labor in nulliparous women affect maternal and neonatal outcomes?

Yvonne W. Cheng, Linda M. Hopkins, Aaron Caughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

171 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine maternal and neonatal outcomes in relation to lengthening intervals of the second stage of labor. This is a retrospective cohort study of 15,759 nulliparous, term, cephalic, singleton births at the University of California, San Francisco, between 1976 and 2001. The second stage of labor was divided into 1-hour intervals. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were compared with the use of chi-squared and Student t tests, and a probability value of ≤.05 was used to indicate statistical significance. Potential confounders were controlled for with multivariate logistic regression. Increasing rates of cesarean delivery, operative vaginal delivery, and perineal trauma were associated with the second stage beyond the first hour. In multivariate analysis, the >4-hour interval group had higher rates of cesarean delivery (odds ratio, 5.65; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)933-938
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume191
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Second Labor Stage
Mothers
San Francisco
Cohort Studies
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Head
Parturition
Students
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Complication
  • Mode of delivery
  • Second stage of labor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

How long is too long : Does a prolonged second stage of labor in nulliparous women affect maternal and neonatal outcomes? / Cheng, Yvonne W.; Hopkins, Linda M.; Caughey, Aaron.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 191, No. 3, 09.2004, p. 933-938.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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