How Do US Pediatric Residency Programs Teach and Evaluate Community Pediatrics and Advocacy Training?

Cara Lichtenstein, Benjamin Hoffman, Rachel Y. Moon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective In 2013, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education updated requirements for training in community pediatrics and advocacy in pediatric residency programs. In light of this update, the aim of this study was to better understand how community pediatrics is being taught and evaluated in pediatric residency programs in the United States. Methods Cross-sectional exploratory study using a Web-based survey of pediatric residency program directors in September 2014. Questions focused on teaching and evaluation of 10 community pediatrics competencies. Results Of 85 programs (43% response rate), 30% offered a separate training track and/or 6-block individualized curriculum in community pediatrics or advocacy. More than 75% required all residents to learn 7 of 10 competencies queried. Respondents in urban settings were more likely to teach care of special populations (P =.02) and public speaking (P <.01). Larger programs were more likely to teach (P =.04) and evaluate (P =.02) community-based research. Experiential learning and classroom-based didactics were the most frequent teaching methodologies. Many programs used multiple teaching methodologies for all competencies. Observation was the most frequent evaluation technique used; portfolio review and written reflection were also commonly reported. Conclusions Our findings show a strong emphasis on community pediatrics and advocacy teaching among responding US pediatric residency programs. Although respondents reported a variety of teaching and evaluation methods, there were few statistically significant differences between programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)544-549
Number of pages6
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Internship and Residency
Pediatrics
Teaching
Graduate Medical Education
Problem-Based Learning
Accreditation
Curriculum
Cross-Sectional Studies
Observation
Research

Keywords

  • advocacy
  • community pediatrics
  • residency training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

How Do US Pediatric Residency Programs Teach and Evaluate Community Pediatrics and Advocacy Training? / Lichtenstein, Cara; Hoffman, Benjamin; Moon, Rachel Y.

In: Academic Pediatrics, Vol. 17, No. 5, 01.07.2017, p. 544-549.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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