Hospital variation and risk factors for bronchopulmonary dysplasia in a population-based cohort

Wannasiri Lapcharoensap, Susan C. Gage, Peiyi Kan, Jochen Profit, Gary M. Shaw, Jeffrey B. Gould, David K. Stevenson, Hugh O'Brodovich, Henry C. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

IMPORTANCE: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) remains a serious morbidity in very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants (<1500 g). Deregionalization of neonatal care has resulted in an increasing number of VLBW infants treated in community hospitals with unknown impact on the development of BPD. OBJECTIVE: To identify individual risk factors for BPD development and hospital variation of BPD rates across all levels of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) within the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective cohort study (January 2007 to December 2011) from the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative including more than 90% of California's NICUs. Eligible VLBW infants born between 22 to 29 weeks' gestational age. EXPOSURES: Varying levels of intensive care. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Bronchopulmonary dysplasiawas defined as continuous supplemental oxygen use at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. A combined outcome of BPD or mortality prior to 36 weeks was used. Multivariable logistic regression accounting for hospital as a random effect and gestational age as a risk factor was used to assess individual risk factors for BPD. This model was applied to determine risk-adjusted rates of BPD across hospitals and assess associations between levels of care and BPD rates. RESULTS: The study cohort included 15 779 infants, of which 1534 infants died prior to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. A total of 7081 infants, or 44.8%, met the primary outcome of BPD or death prior to 36 weeks. Combined BPD or death rates across 116 NICUs varied from 17.7%to 73.4%(interquartile range, 38.7%-54.1%). Compared with level IV NICUs, the risk for developing BPD was higher for level II NICUs (odds ratio, 1.23; 95%CI, 1.02-1.49) and similar for level III NICUs (odds ratio, 1.04; 95%CI, 0.95-1.14). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia or death prior to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age affects approximately 45%of VLBW infants across California. The wide variability in BPD occurrence across hospitals could offer insights into potential risk or preventive factors. Additionally, our findings suggest that increased regionalization of NICU care may reduce BPD among VLBW infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e143676
JournalJAMA Pediatrics
Volume169
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Population
Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Perinatal Care
Quality of Health Care
Gestational Age
Cohort Studies
Odds Ratio
Mortality
Community Hospital
Critical Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Hospital variation and risk factors for bronchopulmonary dysplasia in a population-based cohort. / Lapcharoensap, Wannasiri; Gage, Susan C.; Kan, Peiyi; Profit, Jochen; Shaw, Gary M.; Gould, Jeffrey B.; Stevenson, David K.; O'Brodovich, Hugh; Lee, Henry C.

In: JAMA Pediatrics, Vol. 169, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. e143676.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lapcharoensap, W, Gage, SC, Kan, P, Profit, J, Shaw, GM, Gould, JB, Stevenson, DK, O'Brodovich, H & Lee, HC 2015, 'Hospital variation and risk factors for bronchopulmonary dysplasia in a population-based cohort', JAMA Pediatrics, vol. 169, no. 2, pp. e143676. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.3676
Lapcharoensap, Wannasiri ; Gage, Susan C. ; Kan, Peiyi ; Profit, Jochen ; Shaw, Gary M. ; Gould, Jeffrey B. ; Stevenson, David K. ; O'Brodovich, Hugh ; Lee, Henry C. / Hospital variation and risk factors for bronchopulmonary dysplasia in a population-based cohort. In: JAMA Pediatrics. 2015 ; Vol. 169, No. 2. pp. e143676.
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abstract = "IMPORTANCE: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) remains a serious morbidity in very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants (<1500 g). Deregionalization of neonatal care has resulted in an increasing number of VLBW infants treated in community hospitals with unknown impact on the development of BPD. OBJECTIVE: To identify individual risk factors for BPD development and hospital variation of BPD rates across all levels of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) within the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective cohort study (January 2007 to December 2011) from the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative including more than 90{\%} of California's NICUs. Eligible VLBW infants born between 22 to 29 weeks' gestational age. EXPOSURES: Varying levels of intensive care. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Bronchopulmonary dysplasiawas defined as continuous supplemental oxygen use at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. A combined outcome of BPD or mortality prior to 36 weeks was used. Multivariable logistic regression accounting for hospital as a random effect and gestational age as a risk factor was used to assess individual risk factors for BPD. This model was applied to determine risk-adjusted rates of BPD across hospitals and assess associations between levels of care and BPD rates. RESULTS: The study cohort included 15 779 infants, of which 1534 infants died prior to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. A total of 7081 infants, or 44.8{\%}, met the primary outcome of BPD or death prior to 36 weeks. Combined BPD or death rates across 116 NICUs varied from 17.7{\%}to 73.4{\%}(interquartile range, 38.7{\%}-54.1{\%}). Compared with level IV NICUs, the risk for developing BPD was higher for level II NICUs (odds ratio, 1.23; 95{\%}CI, 1.02-1.49) and similar for level III NICUs (odds ratio, 1.04; 95{\%}CI, 0.95-1.14). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia or death prior to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age affects approximately 45{\%}of VLBW infants across California. The wide variability in BPD occurrence across hospitals could offer insights into potential risk or preventive factors. Additionally, our findings suggest that increased regionalization of NICU care may reduce BPD among VLBW infants.",
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AU - Shaw, Gary M.

AU - Gould, Jeffrey B.

AU - Stevenson, David K.

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AU - Lee, Henry C.

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N2 - IMPORTANCE: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) remains a serious morbidity in very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants (<1500 g). Deregionalization of neonatal care has resulted in an increasing number of VLBW infants treated in community hospitals with unknown impact on the development of BPD. OBJECTIVE: To identify individual risk factors for BPD development and hospital variation of BPD rates across all levels of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) within the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective cohort study (January 2007 to December 2011) from the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative including more than 90% of California's NICUs. Eligible VLBW infants born between 22 to 29 weeks' gestational age. EXPOSURES: Varying levels of intensive care. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Bronchopulmonary dysplasiawas defined as continuous supplemental oxygen use at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. A combined outcome of BPD or mortality prior to 36 weeks was used. Multivariable logistic regression accounting for hospital as a random effect and gestational age as a risk factor was used to assess individual risk factors for BPD. This model was applied to determine risk-adjusted rates of BPD across hospitals and assess associations between levels of care and BPD rates. RESULTS: The study cohort included 15 779 infants, of which 1534 infants died prior to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. A total of 7081 infants, or 44.8%, met the primary outcome of BPD or death prior to 36 weeks. Combined BPD or death rates across 116 NICUs varied from 17.7%to 73.4%(interquartile range, 38.7%-54.1%). Compared with level IV NICUs, the risk for developing BPD was higher for level II NICUs (odds ratio, 1.23; 95%CI, 1.02-1.49) and similar for level III NICUs (odds ratio, 1.04; 95%CI, 0.95-1.14). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia or death prior to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age affects approximately 45%of VLBW infants across California. The wide variability in BPD occurrence across hospitals could offer insights into potential risk or preventive factors. Additionally, our findings suggest that increased regionalization of NICU care may reduce BPD among VLBW infants.

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