Home Anticoagulation Testing

Predictors of Rural Patient Interest

Jacquelyn Quin, Stephen Markwell, Laura Q. Rogers, Robert Mclafferty, Matthew Reinersman, Stephen Hazelrigg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Home anticoagulation testing (HAT) may be useful for rural patients who cannot attend an anticoagulation service clinic (ASC). Interest in HAT is unknown and was the focus of this study. Materials and methods: Anticoagulated patients from two clinics, the ASC and vascular surgery clinic (VSC) were surveyed and compared for demographics, anticoagulation knowledge and opinions, and HAT interest. Logistic regression was performed, using the entire patient cohort, to identify factors associated with HAT interest. Results: There were 211 (141 ASC, 70 VSC) patients surveyed. Differences between the ASC and VSC patients included education level (13.2 versus 12.1 years; P = 0.02), time spent testing (60.5 ± 33.5 versus 46.4 ± 20.7 min; P = 0.001), use of fingerstick testing (90% versus 2.9%; P <0.001), and knowledge of the potential interaction of warfarin with medications or diet (79% versus 59% P = 0.003). HAT interest was similar (62.1% ASC versus 50% VSC; P = 0.14). Factors associated with HAT interest included employment [odds ratio (OR) 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-6.7], knowledge of potential interactions between medications and warfarin (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.9-8.1), and a willingness to check international normalized ratio values more frequently if recommended (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.6). Patients who received family help with medications appeared less interested in HAT (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.12-0.68). Conclusions: A slight majority of surveyed rural patients conveyed interest in HAT. Working patients and those assuming more responsibility for international normalized ratio control may be more interested in HAT. A possible association between anticoagulation knowledge and increased HAT interest was seen and should be further studied.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-237
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume136
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Blood Vessels
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
International Normalized Ratio
Warfarin
Patient Education
Logistic Models
Demography
Diet

Keywords

  • anticoagulation
  • monitoring devices
  • rural population
  • survey research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Home Anticoagulation Testing : Predictors of Rural Patient Interest. / Quin, Jacquelyn; Markwell, Stephen; Rogers, Laura Q.; Mclafferty, Robert; Reinersman, Matthew; Hazelrigg, Stephen.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 136, No. 2, 12.2006, p. 232-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Quin, J, Markwell, S, Rogers, LQ, Mclafferty, R, Reinersman, M & Hazelrigg, S 2006, 'Home Anticoagulation Testing: Predictors of Rural Patient Interest', Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 136, no. 2, pp. 232-237. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2006.05.018
Quin, Jacquelyn ; Markwell, Stephen ; Rogers, Laura Q. ; Mclafferty, Robert ; Reinersman, Matthew ; Hazelrigg, Stephen. / Home Anticoagulation Testing : Predictors of Rural Patient Interest. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2006 ; Vol. 136, No. 2. pp. 232-237.
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