HIV seroprevalence among homeless and marginally housed adults in San Francisco

Marjorie J. Robertson, Richard A. Clark, Edwin D. Charlebois, Jacqueline Tulsky, Heather L. Long, David Bangsberg, Andrew R. Moss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

166 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We report HIV seroprevalence and risk factors for urban indigent adults. Methods. A total of 2508 adults from shelters, meal programs, and low-cost hotels received interviews, blood tests, and tuberculosis screening. Results. Seroprevalence was 10.5% overall, 29.6% for men reporting sex with men (MSM), 7.7% for non-MSM injection drug users (IDUs), and 5.0% for residual non-MSM/non-IDUs. Risk factors were identified for MSM (sex trade among Whites, non-White race, recent receptive anal sex, syphilis), non-MSM IDUs (syphilis, lower education, prison, syringe sharing, transfusion), and residual subjects (≥5 recent sexual partners, female crack users who gave sex for drugs). Conclusions. HIV seroprevalence was 5 times greater for indigent adults than in San Francisco generally. Sexual behavior predicted HIV infection better than drug use, even among IDUs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1207-1217
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume94
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2004
Externally publishedYes

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HIV Seroprevalence
San Francisco
Drug Users
Syphilis
Poverty
Sexual Behavior
Injections
Needle Sharing
Prisons
Sexual Partners
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Hematologic Tests
Pharmaceutical Preparations
HIV Infections
Meals
Tuberculosis
Interviews
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Robertson, M. J., Clark, R. A., Charlebois, E. D., Tulsky, J., Long, H. L., Bangsberg, D., & Moss, A. R. (2004). HIV seroprevalence among homeless and marginally housed adults in San Francisco. American Journal of Public Health, 94(7), 1207-1217.

HIV seroprevalence among homeless and marginally housed adults in San Francisco. / Robertson, Marjorie J.; Clark, Richard A.; Charlebois, Edwin D.; Tulsky, Jacqueline; Long, Heather L.; Bangsberg, David; Moss, Andrew R.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 94, No. 7, 07.2004, p. 1207-1217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robertson, MJ, Clark, RA, Charlebois, ED, Tulsky, J, Long, HL, Bangsberg, D & Moss, AR 2004, 'HIV seroprevalence among homeless and marginally housed adults in San Francisco', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 94, no. 7, pp. 1207-1217.
Robertson MJ, Clark RA, Charlebois ED, Tulsky J, Long HL, Bangsberg D et al. HIV seroprevalence among homeless and marginally housed adults in San Francisco. American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1207-1217.
Robertson, Marjorie J. ; Clark, Richard A. ; Charlebois, Edwin D. ; Tulsky, Jacqueline ; Long, Heather L. ; Bangsberg, David ; Moss, Andrew R. / HIV seroprevalence among homeless and marginally housed adults in San Francisco. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2004 ; Vol. 94, No. 7. pp. 1207-1217.
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