HIV-related risk behaviors, perceptions of risk, HIV testing, and exposure to prevention messages and methods among urban American Indians and Alaska Natives

Jodi Lapidus, Jeanne Bertolli, Karen McGowan, Patrick Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The goal of this study was to describe HIV risk behaviors, perceptions, testing, and prevention exposure among urban American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN). Interviewers administered a questionnaire to participants recruited through anonymous peer-referral sampling. Chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression were used to compare HIV testing by perception of risk and risk behavior status. Of 218 respondents with seronegative or unknown HIV status, 156 (72%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 66-78%) reported some HIV risk behavior: 57 (26%, 95% CI: 20-32%) high-risk behavior, and 99 (45%, 95% CI: 39-52%), potentially high-risk. Among respondents reporting high-risk behavior, 44% rated themselves at no or low risk for HIV infection. Overall, 180 respondents (83%, 95% CI: 78-88%) had ever received an HIV test, 79 (36%, 95% CI: 31-57%) in the past year. HIV risk behaviors and perception of risk were independently associated with recent HIV testing after adjustment for gender, income, and homelessness (odds ratio [OR] = 3.6; 95% CI: 1.5-9.0 for high-risk behavior vs. no reported risk behavior, and OR: 3.2; 95% CI: 1.3-7.6, for high vs. no perceived risk). Addressing inaccurate perception of risk may be a key to improving uptake of HIV testing among high-risk urban AI/AN.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)546-559
Number of pages14
JournalAIDS Education and Prevention
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

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North American Indians
American Indian
Risk-Taking
risk behavior
HIV
confidence
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Homeless Persons
Alaska Natives
Chi-Square Distribution
homelessness
HIV Infections
Referral and Consultation
Logistic Models
logistics
Interviews
income
regression
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Education

Cite this

HIV-related risk behaviors, perceptions of risk, HIV testing, and exposure to prevention messages and methods among urban American Indians and Alaska Natives. / Lapidus, Jodi; Bertolli, Jeanne; McGowan, Karen; Sullivan, Patrick.

In: AIDS Education and Prevention, Vol. 18, No. 6, 12.2006, p. 546-559.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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