Histamine, cAMP, and activation of piglet gastric mucosa.

T. E. Machen, Michael Rutten, E. B. Ekblad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The involvement of cAMP as a second messenger for histamine-induced H+ secretion was studied in a physiologically active, in vitro preparation of piglet gastric mucosa. During the first 5--10 min of stimulation with either histamine or the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1,4-methylxanthine (IBMX), increases (greater than or equal to 5-fold) in tissue cAMP content [(c-AMP]) were well correlated with the characteristic decrease in transepithelial resistance (R); these changes precede H+ secretion by several minutes. Control experiments indicate that, during these treatments, tissue [cAMP] is dominated by the [cAMP] of oxyntic cells alone; change in R and H+ are also related to activity of these cells alone. At the steady state (45 min), histamine and IBMX caused equivalent increases in H+ and decreases in R, but [cAMP] was markedly different in the two cases. With IBMX [cAMP] was elevated at least fivefold, whereas with histamine [cAMP] was less than or equal to 50% above resting levels. The tissue is also stimulated by exogenous additions of dibutyryl cAMP. A histamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase was present in isolated, purified oxyntic cells. The histamine sensitivity of the cyclase was very similar to that which the intact tissue exhibits for histamine-induced changes in H+ and R. The cyclase activity was blocked by cimetidine but not by promethazine. We conclude that during stimulation histamine activates a histamine (H2)-sensitive adenylate cyclase of oxyntic cells, and there is a rapid increase in cellular [cAMP] that is involved in activation of H+ transport and other associated changes of oxyntic cells. An active phosphodiesterase is responsible for reducing [cAMP] to a level much below the "peak" value. Other cellular factors (e.g. protein kinases and Ca2+-calmodulin) must also be involved in the maintenance of the stimulated state of oxyntic cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe American journal of physiology
Volume242
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1982
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gastric Mucosa
Histamine
Gastric Parietal Cells
1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine
Adenylyl Cyclases
Promethazine
Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors
Cimetidine
Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases
Second Messenger Systems
Calmodulin
Protein Kinases
Maintenance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Machen, T. E., Rutten, M., & Ekblad, E. B. (1982). Histamine, cAMP, and activation of piglet gastric mucosa. The American journal of physiology, 242(2).

Histamine, cAMP, and activation of piglet gastric mucosa. / Machen, T. E.; Rutten, Michael; Ekblad, E. B.

In: The American journal of physiology, Vol. 242, No. 2, 02.1982.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Machen, TE, Rutten, M & Ekblad, EB 1982, 'Histamine, cAMP, and activation of piglet gastric mucosa.', The American journal of physiology, vol. 242, no. 2.
Machen, T. E. ; Rutten, Michael ; Ekblad, E. B. / Histamine, cAMP, and activation of piglet gastric mucosa. In: The American journal of physiology. 1982 ; Vol. 242, No. 2.
@article{b347833f9e024136a56928858de1ea76,
title = "Histamine, cAMP, and activation of piglet gastric mucosa.",
abstract = "The involvement of cAMP as a second messenger for histamine-induced H+ secretion was studied in a physiologically active, in vitro preparation of piglet gastric mucosa. During the first 5--10 min of stimulation with either histamine or the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1,4-methylxanthine (IBMX), increases (greater than or equal to 5-fold) in tissue cAMP content [(c-AMP]) were well correlated with the characteristic decrease in transepithelial resistance (R); these changes precede H+ secretion by several minutes. Control experiments indicate that, during these treatments, tissue [cAMP] is dominated by the [cAMP] of oxyntic cells alone; change in R and H+ are also related to activity of these cells alone. At the steady state (45 min), histamine and IBMX caused equivalent increases in H+ and decreases in R, but [cAMP] was markedly different in the two cases. With IBMX [cAMP] was elevated at least fivefold, whereas with histamine [cAMP] was less than or equal to 50{\%} above resting levels. The tissue is also stimulated by exogenous additions of dibutyryl cAMP. A histamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase was present in isolated, purified oxyntic cells. The histamine sensitivity of the cyclase was very similar to that which the intact tissue exhibits for histamine-induced changes in H+ and R. The cyclase activity was blocked by cimetidine but not by promethazine. We conclude that during stimulation histamine activates a histamine (H2)-sensitive adenylate cyclase of oxyntic cells, and there is a rapid increase in cellular [cAMP] that is involved in activation of H+ transport and other associated changes of oxyntic cells. An active phosphodiesterase is responsible for reducing [cAMP] to a level much below the {"}peak{"} value. Other cellular factors (e.g. protein kinases and Ca2+-calmodulin) must also be involved in the maintenance of the stimulated state of oxyntic cells.",
author = "Machen, {T. E.} and Michael Rutten and Ekblad, {E. B.}",
year = "1982",
month = "2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "242",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology - Renal Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology",
issn = "1931-857X",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Histamine, cAMP, and activation of piglet gastric mucosa.

AU - Machen, T. E.

AU - Rutten, Michael

AU - Ekblad, E. B.

PY - 1982/2

Y1 - 1982/2

N2 - The involvement of cAMP as a second messenger for histamine-induced H+ secretion was studied in a physiologically active, in vitro preparation of piglet gastric mucosa. During the first 5--10 min of stimulation with either histamine or the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1,4-methylxanthine (IBMX), increases (greater than or equal to 5-fold) in tissue cAMP content [(c-AMP]) were well correlated with the characteristic decrease in transepithelial resistance (R); these changes precede H+ secretion by several minutes. Control experiments indicate that, during these treatments, tissue [cAMP] is dominated by the [cAMP] of oxyntic cells alone; change in R and H+ are also related to activity of these cells alone. At the steady state (45 min), histamine and IBMX caused equivalent increases in H+ and decreases in R, but [cAMP] was markedly different in the two cases. With IBMX [cAMP] was elevated at least fivefold, whereas with histamine [cAMP] was less than or equal to 50% above resting levels. The tissue is also stimulated by exogenous additions of dibutyryl cAMP. A histamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase was present in isolated, purified oxyntic cells. The histamine sensitivity of the cyclase was very similar to that which the intact tissue exhibits for histamine-induced changes in H+ and R. The cyclase activity was blocked by cimetidine but not by promethazine. We conclude that during stimulation histamine activates a histamine (H2)-sensitive adenylate cyclase of oxyntic cells, and there is a rapid increase in cellular [cAMP] that is involved in activation of H+ transport and other associated changes of oxyntic cells. An active phosphodiesterase is responsible for reducing [cAMP] to a level much below the "peak" value. Other cellular factors (e.g. protein kinases and Ca2+-calmodulin) must also be involved in the maintenance of the stimulated state of oxyntic cells.

AB - The involvement of cAMP as a second messenger for histamine-induced H+ secretion was studied in a physiologically active, in vitro preparation of piglet gastric mucosa. During the first 5--10 min of stimulation with either histamine or the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1,4-methylxanthine (IBMX), increases (greater than or equal to 5-fold) in tissue cAMP content [(c-AMP]) were well correlated with the characteristic decrease in transepithelial resistance (R); these changes precede H+ secretion by several minutes. Control experiments indicate that, during these treatments, tissue [cAMP] is dominated by the [cAMP] of oxyntic cells alone; change in R and H+ are also related to activity of these cells alone. At the steady state (45 min), histamine and IBMX caused equivalent increases in H+ and decreases in R, but [cAMP] was markedly different in the two cases. With IBMX [cAMP] was elevated at least fivefold, whereas with histamine [cAMP] was less than or equal to 50% above resting levels. The tissue is also stimulated by exogenous additions of dibutyryl cAMP. A histamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase was present in isolated, purified oxyntic cells. The histamine sensitivity of the cyclase was very similar to that which the intact tissue exhibits for histamine-induced changes in H+ and R. The cyclase activity was blocked by cimetidine but not by promethazine. We conclude that during stimulation histamine activates a histamine (H2)-sensitive adenylate cyclase of oxyntic cells, and there is a rapid increase in cellular [cAMP] that is involved in activation of H+ transport and other associated changes of oxyntic cells. An active phosphodiesterase is responsible for reducing [cAMP] to a level much below the "peak" value. Other cellular factors (e.g. protein kinases and Ca2+-calmodulin) must also be involved in the maintenance of the stimulated state of oxyntic cells.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020097081&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020097081&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 242

JO - American Journal of Physiology - Renal Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology - Renal Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology

SN - 1931-857X

IS - 2

ER -