Higher-level gait disorders: An open frontier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The term higher-level gait disorders (HLGD) defines a category of balance and gait disorders that are not explained by deficits in strength, tone, sensation, or coordination. HLGD are characterized by various combinations of disequilibrium and impaired locomotion. A plethora of new imaging techniques are beginning to determine the neural circuits that are the basis of these disorders. Although a variety of neurodegenerative and other pathologies can produce HLGD, the most common cause appears to be microvascular disease that causes white-matter lesions and thereby disrupts balance/locomotor circuits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1560-1565
Number of pages6
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume28
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2013

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Gait
Locomotion
Pathology

Keywords

  • Balance
  • Falls
  • Gait
  • Gait disorders
  • Locomotor circuits

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Higher-level gait disorders : An open frontier. / Nutt, John.

In: Movement Disorders, Vol. 28, No. 11, 15.09.2013, p. 1560-1565.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nutt, John. / Higher-level gait disorders : An open frontier. In: Movement Disorders. 2013 ; Vol. 28, No. 11. pp. 1560-1565.
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