High plasma homocyst(e)ine levels in elderly Japanese patients are associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk independently from markers of coagulation activation and endothelial cell damage

Kazuomi Kario, Paul Duell, Takefumi Matsuo, Toshiyuki Sakata, Hisao Kato, Kazuyuki Shimada, Toshiyuki Miyata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Elevated plasma homocyst(e)ine is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in many populations, but the relationship between homocyst(e)ine and CVD in Japanese subjects has been unclear. It has been hypothesized that the link between homocyst(e)ine and CVD may be mediated in part by activation of coagulation and endothelial cell injury in the elderly Japanese subjects. To further evaluate this hypothesis, the present cross-sectional study was designed to assess the relationships among plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations, risk of CVD, and markers of coagulation (fibrinogen, FVII, F1 + 2, FVIIa and FXIIa) and endothelial cell damage (vWF and thrombomodulin) in 146 elderly Japanese subjects (79 healthy controls and 67 patients with CVD). The geometric mean (range) of plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations was 10.2 (3.2-33) μmol/l in 79 Japanese healthy elderly subjects. As expected, healthy female and male elderly subjects had homocyst(e)ine levels that were 2.5 and 5.3 μmol/; higher, respectively, compared to healthy young control subjects (n = 62). Healthy young and elderly men had homocyst(e)ine levels that were 1.7 and 4.5 μmol/l higher, respectively, compared to values in women. This higher plasma homocyst(e)ine levels in the elderly subjects were negatively correlated with levels of folic acid, albumin and total cholesterol, but were not significantly related to markers of coagulation or endothelial cell-damage. The results of multiple logistic regression analyses suggested that high homocyst(e)ine levels were independently related to CVD risk. In addition, levels of FVIIa, and F1 + 2 were significantly higher in elderly Japanese patients with CVD compared to elderly subjects without CVD, but were unrelated to plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations. In summary, elevated plasma concentrations of homocyst(e)ine, FVIIa, and F1 + 2 were associated with increased risk of CVD in elderly male and female Japanese subjects, but the association between homocyst(e)ine and CVD was unrelated to abnormalities in markers of coagulation and endothelial cell damage in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)441-449
Number of pages9
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume157
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Cardiovascular Diseases
Endothelial Cells
Healthy Volunteers
Thrombomodulin
Folic Acid
Fibrinogen
Population
Albumins
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Cholesterol
Regression Analysis
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Elderly
  • Endothelial cell damage
  • Factor VII
  • Folate
  • Homocyst(e)ine
  • Japanese
  • Malnutrition
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

High plasma homocyst(e)ine levels in elderly Japanese patients are associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk independently from markers of coagulation activation and endothelial cell damage. / Kario, Kazuomi; Duell, Paul; Matsuo, Takefumi; Sakata, Toshiyuki; Kato, Hisao; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Miyata, Toshiyuki.

In: Atherosclerosis, Vol. 157, No. 2, 2001, p. 441-449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kario, Kazuomi ; Duell, Paul ; Matsuo, Takefumi ; Sakata, Toshiyuki ; Kato, Hisao ; Shimada, Kazuyuki ; Miyata, Toshiyuki. / High plasma homocyst(e)ine levels in elderly Japanese patients are associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk independently from markers of coagulation activation and endothelial cell damage. In: Atherosclerosis. 2001 ; Vol. 157, No. 2. pp. 441-449.
@article{d51492c4a38e458ba37cc93210bc93d8,
title = "High plasma homocyst(e)ine levels in elderly Japanese patients are associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk independently from markers of coagulation activation and endothelial cell damage",
abstract = "Elevated plasma homocyst(e)ine is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in many populations, but the relationship between homocyst(e)ine and CVD in Japanese subjects has been unclear. It has been hypothesized that the link between homocyst(e)ine and CVD may be mediated in part by activation of coagulation and endothelial cell injury in the elderly Japanese subjects. To further evaluate this hypothesis, the present cross-sectional study was designed to assess the relationships among plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations, risk of CVD, and markers of coagulation (fibrinogen, FVII, F1 + 2, FVIIa and FXIIa) and endothelial cell damage (vWF and thrombomodulin) in 146 elderly Japanese subjects (79 healthy controls and 67 patients with CVD). The geometric mean (range) of plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations was 10.2 (3.2-33) μmol/l in 79 Japanese healthy elderly subjects. As expected, healthy female and male elderly subjects had homocyst(e)ine levels that were 2.5 and 5.3 μmol/; higher, respectively, compared to healthy young control subjects (n = 62). Healthy young and elderly men had homocyst(e)ine levels that were 1.7 and 4.5 μmol/l higher, respectively, compared to values in women. This higher plasma homocyst(e)ine levels in the elderly subjects were negatively correlated with levels of folic acid, albumin and total cholesterol, but were not significantly related to markers of coagulation or endothelial cell-damage. The results of multiple logistic regression analyses suggested that high homocyst(e)ine levels were independently related to CVD risk. In addition, levels of FVIIa, and F1 + 2 were significantly higher in elderly Japanese patients with CVD compared to elderly subjects without CVD, but were unrelated to plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations. In summary, elevated plasma concentrations of homocyst(e)ine, FVIIa, and F1 + 2 were associated with increased risk of CVD in elderly male and female Japanese subjects, but the association between homocyst(e)ine and CVD was unrelated to abnormalities in markers of coagulation and endothelial cell damage in this population.",
keywords = "Cardiovascular disease, Elderly, Endothelial cell damage, Factor VII, Folate, Homocyst(e)ine, Japanese, Malnutrition, Myocardial infarction, Stroke",
author = "Kazuomi Kario and Paul Duell and Takefumi Matsuo and Toshiyuki Sakata and Hisao Kato and Kazuyuki Shimada and Toshiyuki Miyata",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1016/S0021-9150(00)00738-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "157",
pages = "441--449",
journal = "Atherosclerosis",
issn = "0021-9150",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - High plasma homocyst(e)ine levels in elderly Japanese patients are associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk independently from markers of coagulation activation and endothelial cell damage

AU - Kario, Kazuomi

AU - Duell, Paul

AU - Matsuo, Takefumi

AU - Sakata, Toshiyuki

AU - Kato, Hisao

AU - Shimada, Kazuyuki

AU - Miyata, Toshiyuki

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Elevated plasma homocyst(e)ine is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in many populations, but the relationship between homocyst(e)ine and CVD in Japanese subjects has been unclear. It has been hypothesized that the link between homocyst(e)ine and CVD may be mediated in part by activation of coagulation and endothelial cell injury in the elderly Japanese subjects. To further evaluate this hypothesis, the present cross-sectional study was designed to assess the relationships among plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations, risk of CVD, and markers of coagulation (fibrinogen, FVII, F1 + 2, FVIIa and FXIIa) and endothelial cell damage (vWF and thrombomodulin) in 146 elderly Japanese subjects (79 healthy controls and 67 patients with CVD). The geometric mean (range) of plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations was 10.2 (3.2-33) μmol/l in 79 Japanese healthy elderly subjects. As expected, healthy female and male elderly subjects had homocyst(e)ine levels that were 2.5 and 5.3 μmol/; higher, respectively, compared to healthy young control subjects (n = 62). Healthy young and elderly men had homocyst(e)ine levels that were 1.7 and 4.5 μmol/l higher, respectively, compared to values in women. This higher plasma homocyst(e)ine levels in the elderly subjects were negatively correlated with levels of folic acid, albumin and total cholesterol, but were not significantly related to markers of coagulation or endothelial cell-damage. The results of multiple logistic regression analyses suggested that high homocyst(e)ine levels were independently related to CVD risk. In addition, levels of FVIIa, and F1 + 2 were significantly higher in elderly Japanese patients with CVD compared to elderly subjects without CVD, but were unrelated to plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations. In summary, elevated plasma concentrations of homocyst(e)ine, FVIIa, and F1 + 2 were associated with increased risk of CVD in elderly male and female Japanese subjects, but the association between homocyst(e)ine and CVD was unrelated to abnormalities in markers of coagulation and endothelial cell damage in this population.

AB - Elevated plasma homocyst(e)ine is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in many populations, but the relationship between homocyst(e)ine and CVD in Japanese subjects has been unclear. It has been hypothesized that the link between homocyst(e)ine and CVD may be mediated in part by activation of coagulation and endothelial cell injury in the elderly Japanese subjects. To further evaluate this hypothesis, the present cross-sectional study was designed to assess the relationships among plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations, risk of CVD, and markers of coagulation (fibrinogen, FVII, F1 + 2, FVIIa and FXIIa) and endothelial cell damage (vWF and thrombomodulin) in 146 elderly Japanese subjects (79 healthy controls and 67 patients with CVD). The geometric mean (range) of plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations was 10.2 (3.2-33) μmol/l in 79 Japanese healthy elderly subjects. As expected, healthy female and male elderly subjects had homocyst(e)ine levels that were 2.5 and 5.3 μmol/; higher, respectively, compared to healthy young control subjects (n = 62). Healthy young and elderly men had homocyst(e)ine levels that were 1.7 and 4.5 μmol/l higher, respectively, compared to values in women. This higher plasma homocyst(e)ine levels in the elderly subjects were negatively correlated with levels of folic acid, albumin and total cholesterol, but were not significantly related to markers of coagulation or endothelial cell-damage. The results of multiple logistic regression analyses suggested that high homocyst(e)ine levels were independently related to CVD risk. In addition, levels of FVIIa, and F1 + 2 were significantly higher in elderly Japanese patients with CVD compared to elderly subjects without CVD, but were unrelated to plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations. In summary, elevated plasma concentrations of homocyst(e)ine, FVIIa, and F1 + 2 were associated with increased risk of CVD in elderly male and female Japanese subjects, but the association between homocyst(e)ine and CVD was unrelated to abnormalities in markers of coagulation and endothelial cell damage in this population.

KW - Cardiovascular disease

KW - Elderly

KW - Endothelial cell damage

KW - Factor VII

KW - Folate

KW - Homocyst(e)ine

KW - Japanese

KW - Malnutrition

KW - Myocardial infarction

KW - Stroke

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034905681&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034905681&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0021-9150(00)00738-3

DO - 10.1016/S0021-9150(00)00738-3

M3 - Article

C2 - 11472745

AN - SCOPUS:0034905681

VL - 157

SP - 441

EP - 449

JO - Atherosclerosis

JF - Atherosclerosis

SN - 0021-9150

IS - 2

ER -